‘Gold Rush’: Parker Schnabel Breaks Down the Critical Challenge His Crew is Facing

by Amy Myers
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This season may be one of the toughest for Gold Rush star Parker Schnabel. His newest claim of land, Mud Mountain, is deeper than any location he’s ever mined before. Usually, the young mine boss has found promising sources of gold, but now, he’s risking hundreds of thousands of dollars extra to dig 50 to 60 feet underground. So far, he has yet to find the reward for his efforts.

Ahead of tonight’s episode, Gold Rush teased a clip of Schnabel as he surveyed his latest claim of land. With a worried expression painted on his face, it’s clear that the star’s main concern is how much money he’s pumped into the operation versus how much he’ll actually get out of it. While this is always the challenge that mine bosses must face, this may be one of the few times that Schnabel doesn’t feel confident in his decisions.

“They don’t call it Mud Mountain for nothing,” the show tweeted along with the clip.

“Mud Mountain, it’s supposed to be really good gold but it is 50 feet deep. Some of it’s 60 feet deep, and that’s 40-50 grand a day, just doing stripping” the Gold Rush star explained. “The bills keep coming in, and right now we’re only sluicing up the airstrip.”

As always, Schnabel’s most loyal crew member, the black dog named Dozer, followed him as he observed the scene. Dozer frequently accompanies the Gold Rush star to his mining destinations, providing a bit of companionship and emotional support during his chaotic days. But it seems the only thing that will lift his spirits this time is the sight of gold specks.

“The gold’s just not coming in that fast. So, we definitely need to step it up,” Schnabel said.

‘Gold Rush’ Star Finds Himself in a Tough Spot While Clearing Land

Parker Schnabel isn’t the only one struggling this season. Meanwhile, a member of fellow Gold Rush star Rick Ness’ crew finds himself in a bit of a pickle while maneuvering a new piece of equipment. Experienced excavator Brennan Ruault took control of the 900-Horsepower, 300,000-pound 475 bulldozers that cost his mine boss roughly $500,000. Its massive size allows the operator to push twice the amount the typical rock truck can.

Ness tasked the fellow Gold Rush crew member with the task of clearing some of the land away, and Ruault was happy to for the change in jobs. However, once the sun came out and began to heat up the frozen ground, he quickly realized just how soft the dirt beneath the vehicle was and began to fear that he would sink deeper.

Sure enough, just moments later, Ruault’s machine was trapped in the mud. He let out a slew of expletives as he tried to divulge his next plan of action.

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