‘Gold Rush’ Star Dave Turin Showed Off His Mean Side When a Disobedient Worker Challenged Him on a Dig

by Joe Rutland
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Outsiders know about pressure. “Gold Rush” star Dave Turin does, too, but sometimes it can lead to conflict while in the midst of work.

Such a situation happened when a disobedient worker decided to challenge the boss man.

Clarke James, one of Turin’s employees, happened to miss a flight. That put him behind and returning late to the mine. When Turin started talking with James, it became clear the signals were not straight.

Conflict resolution might be called in some situations. On “Gold Rush,” there’s no time for HR shenanigans. Take a look at how Turin and James discuss their issues. This clip comes from the first season of the spin-off, “Dave Turin’s Lost Mine.”

Make note of one thing: If you are a touchy-feely kind of person, then working for Dave might not be the right person to work with.

Did you catch Clarke say to Turin as Dave walked away, “Oh, that’s great leadership. Just walk the f–k away.”

That little dig (no pun intended) brought the boss man right back over to chat a little more.

It’s stressful out there digging for gold. Maybe both men can learn something from this interaction. But one thing is clear. Dave Turin calls the shots on the mine site.

Someone has to do it, you know? Gold digging is serious work. Both men know it. But there only can be one boss. In this case, it’s Dave in the morning, afternoon, and night.

“Gold Rush” and this spin-off, “Dave Turin’s Lost Mine,” keep rolling along on the Discovery Channel.

One ‘Gold Rush’ Star Stopped Yelling At Crew When Working

As you can tell in the clip, Turin had a choice word or two for Clarke. They were having a discussion and not a yelling match.

Well, two other gold miners on “Gold Rush” also have worked on their communication skills.

Rick Ness and Parker Schnabel have been in the mines for some time. Both men have different styles. Ness goes for a disciplined approach; Schnabel yells.

“Rick outgrew blowing up at people; I didn’t,” Schnabel said in an interview with Entrepreneur. “But I’ve tried to limit my outbursts in the last few years. They tend not to get you anywhere, I’ve found.”

Ness said that Schnabel is the “yeller” between both men. He, though, believes it’s easier to be a stricter boss.

“You know, sometimes I think it would be so much easier if it were just some guys I didn’t know as friends,” Ness said. “But you do live in with them as well — it’s not like you send them home at the end of the day — so I’d rather be with my buddies. I’m not much of [a] yeller. I was as a kid but outgrew that.”

Outsider.com