‘Jeopardy!’ Icon Ken Jennings Cracks Joke About Watching ‘Last Man Standing’ on Airplanes

by Jennifer Shea
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Former “Jeopardy!” champ Ken Jennings is taking to Twitter again. This time he’s tweeting about watching the recently-ended TV show “Last Man Standing” on airplanes.

“I love this show they have on airplanes called ‘Last Man Standing,’” Jennings cracked on Monday.

‘Last Man Standing’ Recently Ended Its Nine-Season Run

After six seasons on ABC and three on Fox, “Last Man Standing” finally said goodbye to fans this May. The series had chronicled the exploits of Mike Baxter (Tim Allen) and his family. Baxter was a marketing executive at Outdoor Man, a Colorado sporting goods and recreation store.

Following some casting changes and cancellation by ABC, the show settled in to its home on Fox, only to be canceled in its ninth season. But “Last Man Standing” showrunner Kevin Abbott said the three final seasons at least gave them a chance to end the show on their terms.

“I was also running this show at the end of Season 6 [at ABC],” Abbott told TVLine this past May. “That was the only year we didn’t think we were on the bubble, and we got canceled. One of our main goals was really to make Tim [Allen] feel that it was an appropriate end to this series that he had put so much of himself into, and dedicated so much [of his time], and felt so strongly about. I would have felt terrible if he walked away feeling incomplete.”

The creative team behind “Last Man Standing” considered several possible endings to the series before ultimately landing on one in which Baxter’s 1956 Ford F-100 truck gets stolen and stripped for parts. Baxter and company end up eulogizing the truck, in the process metaphorically saying their goodbyes to the show itself.

“There was going to be a bittersweet, melancholy underpinning to everything,” Abbott said of the other possible endings they considered. “That’s why we made [the finale] about the truck being stolen and made the truck the metaphor for losing something that you care about and invested in for a long time. We could say goodbye to the truck [and] keep that bittersweet, maudlin quality to [just] one scene.”

It was an emotional goodbye for the show’s cast and crew, who may not be amused by Jennings’s tweet. But the flip side to being a popular TV series is that everyone has an opinion about your show.

Outsider.com