Jimi Hendrix’s Death in 1970 Remains Mystery, New Book Calls It ‘Avoidable Accident’

by Keeli Parkey
jimi-hendrixs-death-1970-remains-mystery-new-book-calls-it-avoidable-accident

Jimi Hendrix’s death at the age of 27 took an acclaimed musician from the world.

And, fifty years later, there are still many questions about the circumstances surrounding his death in London on Sept. 18, 1970. In his new book, “Wild Thing: The Short, Spellbinding Life of Jimi Hendrix,” Philip Norris recounts Hendrix’s life and death. According to Fox News, Norman believes the events that led to Hendrix’s death are “complex.”

“He had returned from a tour where he was showing signs of absolute extreme exhaustion,” Norman explained. “He had a lot of people around who should have been looking after him, but they weren’t. (Hendrix) fell into the clutches of a young German woman named Monika Dannemann. They met while he was on tour some months previously.”

Jimi Hendrix’s Death

According to Norman, Hendrix spent the last hours of his life at the Samarkand Hotel with Dannemann.

“He was having trouble sleeping,” Norman said. “So he asked for something that could help him sleep. She gave him a very powerful sleeping tablet called Vesperax. Each tablet was really a double dose that had to be broken in half.”

Unfortunately, when Hendrix needed medical attention, Norman says it was delayed because of the location of the Samarkand Hotel.

“At the time, Notting Hill was a damaged heel area,” Norman reports. “There was a lot of racial unrest and awful living conditions. The police and ambulance crew didn’t even recognize him or knew who he was. They just thought he was another junkie from Notting Hill.”

In the years since Hendrix’s death, many theories have surfaced about what actually happened. These include, according to Fox News, that the mafia murdered him or he was killed by secret service agents. Norman rejects these as possibilities.

“It was an avoidable accident,” Norman said. “A totally avoidable accident.”

Outsider.com