John Wayne Estate Asks Fans Their Favorite Quote From ‘True Grit’ and the Responses Would Make the Duke Proud

by Josh Lanier
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True Grit is one of the films John Wayne is best known for, and it’s full of quotes that have stood the test of time.

So his estate asked his fans on Instagram to choose their favorite.

Several people chose what is most likely the most famous line from the film. When Wayne’s Rooster Cogburn faces off against Robert Duvall’s Ned Pepper and his gang. After Pepper insults Cogburn, calling him a “bald, one-eyed fat man,” Wayne delivers the epic, “Fill your hands, you son of a b***h,” before starting his charge toward the four men.

Some other fan-chosen notable quotable lines from True Grit included “Baby sister, I was born game, and I intend to go out that way.”

Or when a drunk Cogburn has a face-off with rat he spots feeding on cornmeal near where he’s eating.

“Mr. Rat! I have a writ here says you’re to stop eatin’ Chin Lee’s cornmeal forthwith! It’s a rat writ, writ’ for a rat, and this is lawful service of same!”

And, some pointed out that the quote that almost seemed a call back to another John Wayne film, The Alamo.

“La Boeuf if you get crossways of me you’d think a thousand of brick had fell on ya. You’d wish you were back at the Alamo,” some posted.

John Wayne Didn’t Expect to Win Oscar for the Role

John Wayne began his acting career in 1929, the same year as the Academy Awards began. And during his entire career, he was only nominated three times.

Wayne was first nominated for Best Actor for Sands of Iwo Jima in 1950 but lost to Broderick Crawford for All The King’s Men. His second nomination came a decade later as a producer for the aforementioned The Alamo, which lost Best Picture to Billy Wilder’s The Apartment.

So, when he was nominated again 10 years later for his role in True Grit, he’d given up hope of ever winning the golden statue. He was happy with the performance, and that was enough for him, he told Roger Ebert ahead of the 1970 Oscars ceremony.

“Well, whether or not I win an Oscar, I’m proud of the performance,” Wayne told Roger Ebert. “I’d be pleased to win one, of course, although I imagine these things mean more to the public than to us. There are a lot of old standbys who don’t have one. That comedian… what the hell is his name? Cary Grant. He never won one, and he’s been a mainstay of this business.”

John Wayne won Best Actor a few weeks after giving that interview.

Outsider.com