‘Leave It To Beaver’: Jerry Mathers Started Rock Band After Show, Had Some Success

by Emily Morgan
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Once Jerry Mathers ended his time on “Leave It To Beaver” in the early ’60s, the child actor pursued a music career, eventually forming his own band.

By the time the classic television comedy finished taping on ABC, Mathers was 15-years-old and didn’t want to leave a career in entertainment behind so soon.

During the ’60s, rock-n-roll quickly became the new, popular standard, and Mathers wanted to get in on it.

Once he made the leap to form his band, he combined “Leave It To Beaver” with his new musical profession. While some may assume he wanted to separate himself from the show that defined him for so many years, he and another bandmember gave their musical group a very familiar name.

Mathers Combines ‘Leave It To Beaver’ With Musical Pursuit

“We started a band called Beaver and the Trappers,” he said. “But the funny part is in high school, I was known as the Beaver and I didn’t mind that people called me that.”

Ironically, when students called Mathers Beaver during high school, it didn’t happen because of the television show.

“[They didn’t call me Beaver] because of “Leave It to Beaver,” he explained. “It’s because we used to play all the proms and sock hops. It was Beaver and the Trappers and I was the lead singer. So they knew me from this rock and roll group.”

The band performed for crowds and even recorded a single, “Happiness Is Havin'” and ” In Misery.”

“We recorded; I did three different records. Beaver and the Trappers did a record. I also recorded for Atlantic, so I [made] three rock and roll records. So I think [television actor and recording artist] Rick Nelson was the inspiration for that, but I think it was far below his quality of work,” he added.

Mathers proved he was more than his lovable character when his singles “Wind-Up Toy” and “Don’t You Cry” received airtime. Furthermore, those singles even made it to the charts.

“We were No. 1 in Alaska and Hawaii,” he said. “But those were the only two states. I guess we debuted on Billboard with a bullet, but only in Alaska and Hawaii.”

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