‘M*A*S*H’ Icon Alan Alda Takes ‘Plunge’ Joining TikTok With Hilarious First Post

by Emily Morgan
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Alan Alda may be 85-years-old, but that’s not keeping him from staying up on the latest trends. 

Recently, the M*A*S*H alum announced that he was hopping on the TikTok bandwagon in his latest tweet. “So, I took the plunge and joined TikTok. There’s actually some creative stuff there. (Including, of course, my first video.) See if it makes you laugh. Or chuckle. Or at least not draw away in disgust,” the veteran actor tweeted on Tuesday. 

The tweet included a link to Alda’s inaugural TikTok, which shows a clip from Alda during his “M*A*S*H” days as Hawkeye Pierce. Throughout the clip, which has been liked over 500 times, the actor shows viewers glimpses of his days in the classic war drama. We also get to see his tap-dancing moves. By the end of the clip, he reveals that he’s joined the popular app to promote his new podcast, “Clear + Vivid with Alan Alda.”

@thealanalda

My first vid. More tiking and toking to come. #fyp #foryou

♬ original sound – Alan Alda

In the comments section, his fans were elated to learn that the national treasure joined the app. “I’ve never hit follow so fast,” one excited fan wrote when they discovered Alda was on TikTok. 

Alan Alda’s Love for Science

Although many associate Alda with his beloved character from “M*A*S*H,” he made headlines for his love of science. Now he wants to share that love with the rest of the world. 

In December, Alda released his latest podcast, called “Soldiers of Science: The untold story of the Vietnam War, Anthony Fauci, and a generation of doctors who revolutionized American medicine.”

The podcast, written by Alda and Kate Rope, tells the story of the doctor’s draft that brought a new generation of doctors and scientists to the National Institutes of Health.

“It was a moment that actually changed the history of medicine in this country, not just in the development of medicines, but the research labs and universities all over the country,” Alda said, who also narrates the podcast. “It was a fountain of innovation and a way of working that was collegial.

His ideas about science and communication began 11years ago when he began his center at Stony Brook. “Let it be communicated clearly and vividly so that it engages us and that we learn from it,” he said.

“Wouldn’t it be great if we could train scientists to have this connection that we had on camera?” Alda said. Before hosting the podcast, Alda didn’t have much experience interviewing people. He used the techniques he had picked up from improvising during his acting career. 

After thinking about it, he came up with a concept based on training scientists on improvising a message based on personal connection. Whenever Alda was at universities for speaking engagements, he would discuss training students to be scientists as well as good communicators. 

Alda’s center has trained over 15,000 people across the US and in eight other countries in the past decade. 

Outsider.com