Mike Rowe on Why America Needs ‘Dirty Jobs’ Now More Than Ever

by Jon D. B.
mike-rowe-on-why-america-needs-dirty-jobs-now-more-than-ever

Dirty Jobs is back. The man himself, Mike Rowe, never went away. Neither did the hard-working men and women his beloved vehicle highlights. Which is why the show’s return feels pivotal.

We’re at a crucial turning point for America. The COVID-19 Pandemic has changed everything. Yet as Mike highlights, the blue-collar workers Dirty Jobs gives a voice to never stopped. “Not because someone told them they were ‘essential.’ They already knew that,” he says. “No, these men kept working, because working is what they do, come hell or high water.”

Rowe’s words – and the fantastic photos above – come as part of a letter to fans the morning after Episode 2 of Dirty Jobs‘ new season aired. Within, his own in-depth reflection on “the state of things” is itself a response to a letter. A letter from a truly thankful fan.

A Letter to Mike Rowe

Mike,

Ten years later, and it’s like you never stopped. Don’t get me wrong – I see a little more grey hair, and maybe an extra wrinkle or two. But the attitude. The smart aleck quips. The willingness to get in there and roll up your sleeves and do the work. And the laughter! Thank you so much for bringing Dirty Jobs back. This is the show our country needs right now. The Jellyball guys were epic. The epoxy crew were awesome. Randy’s scrotum was terrifying and unforgettable. Great show.

Marc Rose

“Thanks Marc,” Rowe responds on his official Facebook Jan. 10. “The thing that struck me about last night’s show – above and beyond the charm of snot-filled jelly balls and the horror of Randy’s unfortunate scrotum – was the difficulty that both companies face when it comes to recruiting young workers,” the Dirty Jobs icon offers.

“Like the farming business, the fishing industry would not exist without the sons of fishermen following in their father’s footsteps. This seems to be the case in every fishery I’ve ever worked in – including the crabbers in the Bering Sea,” Rowe continues. “More often than not, it’s a family affair. It has to be, because too few on the outside have what it takes work the way Mike Boone and his crew do, every single day.”

‘During a time when 11 million jobs are currently open, these men never stopped.’

To Mike Rowe, “The epoxy guys are similar. The only guy on the crew who was under 60, was Junior – Randy’s son. There’s real money to made in both of these industries, the work is bountiful, and the opportunities to advance are endless. And yet, both industries are struggling mightily to recruit younger workers,” he highlights.

“It’s a sign of the times, I’m afraid. And this was ten months ago. Nearly a year and half before 4.5 million people quit their jobs in a single month.”

Yet it’s worth noting, Mike says, “that during a time when 11 million jobs are currently open, these men never stopped. Not because someone told them they were ‘essential.’ They already knew that. No, these men kept working, because working is what they do, come hell or high water.”

And if that doesn’t perfectly sum up the American spirit, nothing ever will.

As Mike Rowe signs his letter, a hearty “Thanks, one and all” to every single American who keeps this country running.

Outsider.com