‘NCIS’: Ducky Actor David McCallum Said He Has ‘No Regrets’ About His Career

by Jacklyn Krol
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NCIS star David McCallum wouldn’t change a thing about his personal and professional lives.

After being in the television and film industries for almost his entire adulthood, surely there would be some negative aspects with the job.

“I have no regrets. I’ve had a magnificent life all the way,” he told Closer Weekly.

He first sought international fame with his role as Illya Kuryakin in the 60s series The Man From UNCLE. “I got a job, and I was able to pay the bills,” he said. “It was wonderful I had that opportunity. My part was very minor, and it just developed.”

It developed to an extent that he couldn’t go out in public. He was once mobbed in Central Park where mounted police had to rescue him from the crowd. In one instance, he went to Macy’s and an entire two floors were destroyed by fans wanting to catch a glimpse of him.

“I was a little sad in the beginning that I lost my privacy,” he admitted to the outlet. “There’s a certain incognito streak in me.”

Nowadays, “nobody really gives me any problems” despite his major NCIS role. He revealed that he typically gets people who quietly come up to him. They usually thank him and praise his character and previous works. “They just appreciate it, and it’s wonderful,” he concluded.

David McCallum Getting Into ‘NCIS’ Character

David McCallum gives every role his all, but especially Ducky on NCIS. As his character is a medical examiner, he wanted to dive deep into his character. In fact, he is applauded by real-life fans who are in the profession.

“You can’t play a pathologist for ten years and talk about pathology without knowing what you are doing,” McCallum told Radio Times.

Furthermore, he witnessed a Los Angeles coroner conduct real autopsies. After a few years of watching, McCallum had the opportunity to try it for himself. He called his first experience one of the most exciting days of his life.

“Then after a couple of years of watching, the coroner made it possible for me to come the other side of the glass and work with a pathologist and do a full autopsy,” he said.

McCallum later told CNN that it was “extraordinary.” He added, “It’s two hours of learning more about the human body and what a miraculous business it is than you could ever imagine.”

Additionally, his family even nicknamed him “Dr. Death” because he is fascinated by the subject matter.

Outsider.com