‘NCIS: Los Angeles’: How Show Broke a TV Record in the Most Explosive Way, According to the Actors

by Madison Miller
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“NCIS: Los Angeles” is living to see another season after recently getting renewed, alongside the mothership “NCIS.”

This means that there will soon be a season 13 of the show where fans will more than likely witness death, mayhem, action, and massive explosions.

When people call it an explosive show, they likely don’t just mean the twists and turns that constantly pop up. “NCIS: Los Angeles” is distinctive from the other “NCIS” spin-offs for its incredibly action-oriented plot lines.

In a 2016 interview with the Geek Generation, Eric Christian Olsen and Daniela Ruah helped point out just how much the show relies on movie-like action scenes. “I think ours is a little higher octane. It’s like a ‘James Bond’ movie every week. Gunfights, car chases, huge explosions. The biggest explosion in the history of television that was not CGI is on our show, at the end of season 3.”

While this statement is not confirmed, the explosion is impressive enough on its own.

‘NCIS: Los Angeles’ Explosion

So what’s this explosion members of the cast are firing up in interviews?

The explosion takes place during season three of “NCIS: Los Angeles” It’s the season finale called “Sans Voir” and was actually a two-hour-long episode that aired in 2012. The crew is trying to put down an infamous serial killer named the Chameleon. The massive, fiery, non-CGI explosion is the star of the second half of the show.

The executive producer of the show, Shane Brennan, talked about the popular “NCIS: Los Angeles” explosion during a 2012 interview with Entertainment Weekly.

“I’ve been doing this for 30 years, and that explosion — in the world of blowing things up — is a triple A+. And that explosion, that hasn’t been enhanced with any computer graphics at all, and when you see it on air, we have not touched it. The audience, because they’ve gotten so used to seeing it on movies and in television, they often make the assumption that you’ve added some computer graphics — none. We have done nothing to it.”

A scene like the explosion on “NCIS: Los Angeles” takes an incredible amount of work and preparation. Since there’s no CGI in the final project, first and foremost, the explosion needs to be safe. However, it still needs to be jaw-dropping for audiences at home. The timing has to be perfect and there’s really only one chance to get it right. Certainly, the crew accomplished just that.

As for film records, 007 holds the Guinness World Record for the largest film stunt explosion. According to Thrillist, the 24th movie in the James Bond franchise, “Spectre,” put on a massive fiery action scene. They used 8,140 liters of kerosene, 24 one kilogram explosive devices, as well as 300 detonators.

Outsider.com