‘NCIS’ Star Sean Murray’s Sells $4.8 Million Los Angeles Mansion Months After Buying It

by Josh Lanier
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NCIS star Sean Murray purchased a California mansion earlier this year but apparently didn’t care for it. That’s because he recently sold it to Arsenio Hall before ever moving in, reports said.

Yahoo reported Murray unloaded his Tarzana mansion after he bought it only four months ago. Despite this, he made $350,000 on the deal when he sold it for $5.2 million, $200,000 more than he asked for. Yahoo said it didn’t appear that Murray and his family ever moved into it.

Murray, who plays Special Agent Timothy McGee on NCIS, purchased the six-bedroom, six-and-a-half-bath home over the summer. The 6,500-square-feet mansion came with a basketball court, a pool, and a modern style. Yahoo said it doesn’t appear that Murray made any changes to the house. But after he put it back on the market, a bidding war broke out between potential buyers.

You can see photos of the home here.

Earlier this year, Murray gave People magazine a tour of his Encino, Calif., home. He lived there with his wife and children for more than a decade.

It’s unclear why Murray didn’t move into his new home. But Arsenio Hall will move in soon, Yahoo said.

Hall owns a massive 10,000-square-foot home tucked away on 30 acres in the Topanga Mountains. He bought it in the 1990s at the peak of his fame and sunk millions into renovations, The Dirt reported. Some of those include a tennis court, putting green, shaded pond, and towering walls with barbed-wire fences to keep people out.

Sean Murray Pushed ‘NCIS’ Producers to Let Character Grow

Sean Murray joined NCIS in the first season. His character was a “rookie in all kinds of ways,” but over the years, Murray said he pushed the show to let McGee grow into a more rounded character.

“He started out as a very rookie agent with no social skills, big problems communicating, book smarts, no street smarts,” Murray said in a 2016 interview. “No common sense, very studied, computer wiz, MIT and Johns Hopkins studied. But really a rookie in all kinds of ways. I have been very fortunate to have the opportunity of playing a character that has been around for going on 14 years now. I’ve been able to have the character grow and grow with him. That is something not a lot of actors ever get to do.”

He worried that if McGee didn’t learn from his experiences, he would end up like a character from The Simpsons.

“Everyone from the writers to the showrunners have been very receptive [to] it,” he said. “I didn’t want this role to be like ‘The Simpsons’ where the baby, Maggie, resets to default at the beginning of the show each week! If you are going to have a rookie agent on the show, as the show moves forward, it would only make sense that the agent would continue to learn, improve and you would travel along with him as it went.”

Outsider.com