‘Pawn Stars’: Corey Has Bizarre Shrunken Heads of Made of the Cast in Latest Episode

by Jacklyn Krol
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Pawn Stars member Corey had a unique find in the latest episode of the hit series.

The late Richard “Old Man” Harrison, along with Rick Harrison, Austin “Chumlee” Russell and Corey Harrison were immortalized as shrunken heads.

So where exactly did these shrunken heads come from? They were displayed at the Chinatown nightspot The Golden Tiki.

Furthermore, the episode featured the club where the crew came to visit. Club musicians Tony Felicetta, The Sharps, and DJ Tone Def were present.

According to Las Vegas Review Journal, this episode was shot last year. Rick and Chumlee have visited the club a handful of times over the years. The club itself features 40 shrunken heads, some of famous people. The heads were created by Smithsonian artist Terry Barr.

That’s not all what the Pawn Stars crew was modeled after. They were also immortalized in wood. Their heads were created into a case designed by artist Billy the Crud. The piece is exhibited at the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop.

“It’s really great to have the ‘Pawn Stars’ in the club, and I had some really awesome conversations with Rick about another project I’m working on now,” club managing partner Branden Powers told the outlet. “Getting on the TV show wasn’t my only motive, but it’s great to have that opportunity, too.”

See the shrunken heads, below.

How Does ‘Pawn Stars’ Work?

Everyone who watches Pawn Stars has somewhat of an idea about the inner workings. In an interview with NPR from 2011, Rick Harrison explained the entire process. Firstly, most of the items are luxury and high-end.

“Say you have a wedding band. You bring the wedding in[to] my store. I offer you $100 and you accept it. I give you the $100, plus a pawn ticket. You have 120 days to come back to my pawn shop and pick up your merchandise and pay me my money back,” he explained.

Secondly, what happens to the ring? If the person comes back within thirty days, they pay Harrison $115.

“I hand you the ring back and everything’s good in the world,” he added. However, if they don’t come back or pay in full for the item, Harrison keeps it.

“Nothing goes on your credit report,” he assured. “No one chases you down to break any legs or anything like that. You just simply have lost your merchandise.”

Thirdly, for his shop, an average loan is roughly $50. Furthermore, pawn shops do have a service fee and interest that they charge. The fee can range from 10 to 20%.

Finally, in terms of legalities and regulations, they go above and beyond.

“When I take something in pawn or I buy something, I just don’t take [an] ID. I take their driver’s license number, their height, their weight, their eye color, their build,” he said.

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