Photos: LSU Football Makes Fan Section of Dog Cutouts in Empty Stadium Seats

by Halle Ames
photos-lsu-football-makes-fan-section-dog-cutouts-empty-stadium-seats

As the LSU Tigers football team took on the Mississippi State Bulldogs on Saturday, some odd fans were in the crowd this year. 

Due to the pandemic, fans’ attendance will be limited to cheer for their team in Death Valley’s Tiger Stadium. However, they were able to pay for cutouts of pictures they sent in.

Nearly 1,500 cutouts filled the football stadium that can hold over 100,000 roaring fans. 

Many of the cutouts, however, were not of human. LSU had their showing off dozens of four-legged fans that filled their own section. 

According to the athletic department’s spokesperson, around 1,500 dedicated fans, and fur-fans, paid to have their cutout be featured in the stadium, even if they couldn’t be there in person. This number is close to three times as many as school officials projected to sell. 

LSU announced just last week about the cutout promotion. The athletic department also gave fans the option to keep their $50 fat head cutout when the season ends. 

Although the Tigers lost to the Bulldogs 44- 34 after a close battle, many fans on Twitter still showed their Tiger pride. 

College Football in 2020

Stadium capacity requirements vary throughout the country as we enter the seventh month of the pandemic. Although most schools are just happy to be able to play this fall, many fans are upset they will not be able to cheer on their team from the stadium.

Schools like Duke and North Caroline have opted out of having fans, at least until the end of September.

Clemson plans to allow 19,000 fans to cheer on their team, while Florida State is allowing 20 to 25 percent of fans in their stadium along with Ole Miss.

Notre Dame will not have any more than 20 percent of their stadium filled, and Louisville will allow 30 percent of the fans to cheer on their Cardinals.

Almost all schools have canceled their pregame events like tailgating.

[H/T WBRZ]

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