Sam Elliott: Remembering His Hilarious Mustache Dance-Off Commercial From Last Year’s Super Bowl

by Matthew Wilson
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Sam Elliott is known for his iconic mustache. But did you know it could also dance? The actor starred in this hilarious commercial from last year’s Super Bowl.

Lil Nas X may have his horses in the back. But Elliott has a mustache in the front. Both the actor and his facial hair showed off their dance moves. We’re not sure how the commercial makes us want to eat Doritos. But combining Elliott with one of early 2020’s hit songs in a western setting is a hit formula.

The story of the commercial is Lil Nas X strolls into town like one of Clint Eastwood’s archetypes. And the town just isn’t big enough for the two cowboys. They challenge each other to a duel. But like an anti-“Footloose” town, things are settled by the power of dance rather than guns there.

Both Elliott and Lil Nas X begin a dance-off set to the rapper’s “Old Town Road.”

Elliott fans may be dismayed. But he ultimately loses the duel when his horse refuses to break out into dance to match the rapper’s own stallion. But the actor certainly looked like he had a fun time on this one. Another commercial featured Elliott saying lyrics from the song in his deep, signature baritone.

Sam Elliott on His Mustache and Westerns

The actor didn’t set out to have one of cinema’s iconic facial hair. But sometimes, things fall into place that you don’t expect. Elliott contributes its appeal to the fact that he was one of the earlier actors to adopt facial hair. Prior, cowboys and male actors in general were mainly known for the clean-shaven look. But things started to change during Elliott’s era.

“I was one of the early guys from my generation to have hair on his face,” Elliott said. “Me and Tom Selleck, and I was first.”

But we don’t know if Selleck’s mustache can dance quite as well as Elliott’s. As far as being typecast as a cowboy, well Elliott enjoys the genre and considers it part of his heritage as a sixth-generation Texan.

“It’s a heritage that I’ve always been proud of and something I was aware of early on,” Elliott told Cowboy and Indian. “And I saw a lot of westerns when I was a kid at the Saturday matinee back when I got hooked on wanting to be an actor. It’s just a way of thinking. And it’s certainly a way of living.”

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