‘SEAL Team’: One Aspect of Pilot’s Script Sold AJ Buckley on Joining Show

by Kati Michelle
seal-team-aspect-pilot-script-aj-buckley-joining-show

“SEAL Team” first premiered on CBS and Paramount+ back on September 27th of 2017. Now here we are five seasons later. Brotherhood is an intrinsic piece of the special military branch that has typically featured exclusively men recruits (give for this badass woman who was the first to complete naval special warfare training to support the Navy SEALS). Brotherhood is also something that the cast doesn’t take for granted off the screen when the cameras stop rolling. That being said, it’s not the reason AJ Buckley joined the show.

He joined the series as a regular with his no-nonsense Sonny Quinn character after taking just one look at the pilot’s script. It’s the show’s unique angle that immediately took him by surprise and made him want to sign on the project. Buckley broke that down with Mandy in a past interview and here’s what he said.

AJ Buckley Talks About the ‘Human Element’ of the Show

Heading into the second season, AJ Buckley sat down for an interview to discuss the past, present, and future of “SEAL Team.” He immediately called his Sonny Quinn character a “dream role as an actor for so many reasons.”

First, he spoke to the highly prestigious reputation of the elite squad that he and his castmates portray.

“The show itself follows the tier-one operators, these elite group of Navy SEALS that exist over here,” he started. “Kind of like SAS. They are the best of the best.”

Then Buckley got a little emotional. “What I loved about the show when I first read the pilot is that there’s this real human element to these guys that have to go do this as a job. What they choose to go and do and sacrifice.”

Buckley Thinks ‘SEAL Team’ Does Something That No Military Drama Has Done Before

He expanded on his last point trying to emphasize the fact that “SEAL Team” takes a much different approach than your typical military drama. Sure, there are guns and action and all that jazz, but under every uniform is a father or brother or husband. And the horrors they see out in the field stick with them sometimes. It’s a sad fact that almost any veteran will tell you is true.

“It really goes deep into the home life of how families are affected, how these guys are affected coming home, the PTSD, and the support that they need combined with the lack of support that’s there. It really opens up. We’re the first military drama that has gone into that side of it – I fell in love with it.”

That’s exactly why Buckley and the rest of the cast are willing to put their bodies through hell for the role.

Outsider.com