‘The Sound of Music’: Why Christopher Plummer Despised Working on Movie He Called ‘The Sound of Mucus’

by Halle Ames
Sound-Music-Christopher-Plummer-Despised-Working-Movie-Called-Sound-Mucus

“The hills are alive with the sound of mucus?” Well, not exactly, but Christopher Plummer once revealed that is how he remembered it.

It is no secret that Christopher Plummer did not view the 1965 classic film, The Sound of Music, in the highest regards. He frequently referred to the title as either “The Sounds of Mucus” or simply “S&M.”

In 1982, Christopher Plummer spoke to PEOPLE about why the movie was difficult to act in.

“That sentimental stuff is the most difficult for me to play, especially because I’m trained vocally and physically for Shakespeare,” Plummer said. “To do a lousy part like von Trapp, you have to use every trick you know to fill the empty carcass of the role.”

Plummer added, “That damn movie follows me around like an albatross.”

In case you are like me and had no idea what that meant, Google says an albatross is a “very large seabird.” The more you know, right?

Were Christopher Plummer and Julie Andrews Opposites?

Another reason Christopher Plummer held some animosity toward The Sound of Music was due to his co-star being a ray of sunshine. Yep, Plummer described working with the beautiful and kind Julie Andrews as “being hit over the head with a big Valentine’s Day card, every day.”

Both a compliment and an insult.

Regardless, the two stars remained close friends. In a 2015 video interview with both Andrews and Plummer, he offers her a shining compliment.

“The wonderful thing is that she is a great, wonderful, old-fashioned saint. You would follow her as you would Joan of Arc. She is a terrific soldier in battle, and she had a long, long road in The Sound of Music, and every day she was fresh as a daisy.”

Andrews says that Plummer’s cold and tough exterior probably helped his performance as an Austrian captain more.

From a Hate to a Love

The Oscar-winning actor also admitted in 2011 that Captain von Trapp was the “toughest” character he had ever played.

“Because it was so awful and sentimental and gooey,” Christopher Plummer said. “You had to work terribly hard to try and infuse some minuscule bit of humor into it.”

But over time, Plummer grew fond of the film. He even went on to say that it was the “very best of its genre.”

“The more I watched, the more I realized what a terrific movie it is,” he wrote. “The very best of its genre — warm, touching, joyous, and absolutely timeless. Here was I, cynical old sod that I am, being totally seduced by the damn thing — and what’s more, I felt a sudden surge of pride that I’d been part of it.”

I’m telling you, the storyline grows on you like a fungus.

Despite Christopher Plummer’s cold demeanor, we continue to love his works, from then to now following his death. He was 91 years old at his passing on February 5, 2021.

Outsider.com