‘Swamp People’: How Long has Chase Landry Been on the Show?

by Joe Rutland
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Chase Landry has definitely made a name for himself on “Swamp People” as an alligator hunter. How long, though, has he been on the show?

According to an article from Distractify, Chase has been on the show since its third season. Now he’s been influenced a lot by his father, Troy Landry, who has been on The History Channel since day one. “Swamp People” has been showing off the life and times of alligator hunters for 12 seasons.

Troy Landry’s other son, Jacob, has been on the show as long as his old man. If you can notice a pattern here, then you’re on the ball, Outsider. Alligator hunting is part of the Landry family tree and will be for a long time to come.

Alligator Season Comes Around Once A Year For ‘Swamp People’

While a lot of people, including you Outsiders, are watching “Swamp People” one episode at a time, the gator hunters themselves have specific times for their season.

Now you might ask when is the season for Troy Landry and all of the other hunters?

He talked about those specifics during a 2011 interview with TV Tango.

“It lasts a month in each zone,” Landry said. “They overlap. The East zone opens [on] August 25 and lasts four weeks. The West zone opens up the first week of September and lasts four weeks. I fish both zones.”

Obviously, that’s the time when The History Channel crews will go down to the swamps of Louisiana and surrounding areas. Landry, though, makes sure the crew that follows him around during gator hunting season gets some home cooking, Cajun style, while they’re there.

Troy Landry Uses Interesting Technique To Get His Fair Share Of Gator Kills

When it comes to getting his fill of gator kills during a season, Troy Landry has his own way of doing it that is quite interesting.

Landry shared his gator-hunting insights in an interview with the Monticello Herald Journal.

“I like to tie long, white ribbons near my lines because a big part of the alligator’s diet are the white herons that you see all the time along the bank,” Landry, who has been on “Swamp People” since its first season in 2010, said.

“Alligators don’t see good,” he said. “They can smell really good but they don’t see good, so if you put a 2- or 3-foot-long white ribbon hanging on a tree branch that moves when the wind blows, they think it’s a big white heron.”

“Swamp People” is a show that definitely benefits from the wisdom of a longtime hunter like Landry. Of course, the other hunters add their own twists to getting gator hunters. The History Channel show will remain popular with this level of intrigue going on.

Outsider.com