‘Swamp People’ Star Troy Landry’s Love for Fishing, Hunting Began in Grandfather’s ‘Fish Factory’

by Joe Rutland
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Outsiders are among the millions who love to watch “Swamp People” and why not? It’s helped introduce us to Troy Landry.

Landry has been a part of The History Channel show since its first season. He’s also been able to turn that stardom into a clothing line. If you see a hat with “Choot’Em!” on it, then that belongs to him.

But we all might be interested in knowing where the “Swamp People” developed his love for not only fishing but hunting, too.

‘Swamp People’ Star Talked About What He Does In Off-Season

Well, Landry offered some insights about that in a 2012 interview with the New York Post. He talked about what he does after alligator season ends.

“Whatever’s seasonal,” the “Swamp People” star said. “We do catfish, a lot of crawfish. Mostly what I do seven or eight months out of the year, when I’m not fishing alligator, is crawfish.

“Years ago, we would shrimp a lot,” Landry said. “We had shrimp boats, I had a shrimp boat, a small one, my daddy had one, my granddaddy had two of them. My daddy was a commercial fisherman, he had a little fish factory, we’d skin all the fish he would catch, we’d work until 10 or 11 almost every night when I was growing up.”

Working all those hours down on the Louisiana swamplands probably gave Troy Landry a deep appreciation for the Great Outdoors. Outsiders who love spending time outside can understand, in a way, that passion that drives Landry.

“Swamp People” finished showing its 12th season episodes on May 27, 2021. There’s no official word from the network about a 13th season. So, we’ll have to stay tuned and see if the show returns to The History Channel. As long as the ratings remain good, though, it would be hard to believe that “Swamp People” would not be part of History’s lineup.

Now we know there are people who find a kindred spirit in those “Swamp People” gator hunters.

When it comes to danger, Landry knows that showing it on TV can be a reason that the show has been successful and popular.

“It’s the excitement and the danger of the alligators that fascinates a lot of people,” he said in the Post interview. “Alligators have been around since the time of dinosaurs, they’re one of the few animals that’ve survived since the time of dinosaurs.”

Watch the way Landry goes about his business when being out there in the swamps. He’s had some company recently with Cheyenne “Pickle” Wheat joining his work.

Ol’ Troy is not finished with his career in gator hunting, either. Just see how much Landry enjoys his work.

Outsider.com