‘The Golden Girls’: Watch Some of the Most Hilarious Outtakes Caught on Film

by Katie Maloney
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It’s difficult to imagine that The Golden Girls could get any funnier. But these bloopers from the show prove that it’s possible.

From flubbed lines, to swear words, to little jabs between casemates, these bloopers from The Golden Girls have it all. You can even see the famed feud between Betty White and Bea Arthur trickle out during scenes. During a take, Bea messes up her line and Betty White says “Bea screwed up,” and dances around before restarting the scene. During another take, Betty misses her line and Bea Arthur jokingly, yet aggressively pinches Betty on the leg. The best part of the video? Even the blooper reel scenes include cheesecake. So, cut yourself a big slice of The Golden Girls‘ favorite dessert and enjoy these outtakes from the show.

The Golden Girls bloopers

What’s The Secret Ingredient For The Golden Girls Humor?

When you watch The Golden Girls, you may notice that the jokes seem to roll smoothly into the scene, almost like a dance. Well, the writers of the show designed the jokes that way. The flow reflects the rhythm that Betty White said is the key to all humor – especially Golden Girls humor. During an interview, Betty explained how the show’s creators designed the comedy rhythm for the show.

“Humor is such a rhythm thing,” said Betty. “The writers spend hours laboring over a sentence to get the beats. A line will come out, ‘Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the other side.’ You can’t say, ‘Well there was this chicken that decided to cross over, I wonder why he did that. Well, maybe he saw something on the other side.’ You can’t do that. There’s no laugh there.”

The show played host to countless world-famous guest stars including Burt Reynolds, George Clooney, Alex Trebek, and Mario Lopez. Betty said that sometimes guest-stars would arrive at the show but not understand The Golden Girls rhythm.

“Guests would come on and they would start to paraphrase the writing that was there. And the director would say, ‘No, read it the way it’s written.’ And the actors would say, ‘Well, no, it sounds more like me when I read it this way.’ Well, they’d kill all the beats,” said Betty. “They’d put an extra couple of syllables in there and kill the laugh. It’s like feeling the beat in music. You feel it more than hear it. You just feel it.”

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