Tim McGraw Remembers Larry King with Throwback Interview Clip after Death of Legendary TV Host

by Joe Rutland
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Country singer-songwriter Tim McGraw is honoring the memory of Larry King, who died on Saturday, with a clip from an interview.

King sat down with McGraw during a residency for the country hit maker at the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas.

McGraw had a lot of respect for Larry King, who is wearing his ever-present glasses and suspenders in the interview.

After hearing of King’s death, McGraw posted a clip from their Las Vegas interview on Twitter.

In a follow-up tweet, Tim McGraw adds, “Wish we had more shows like his to get to know folks on a different level. He was one of kind. #RIPLARRYKING.”

Larry King Gets Tim McGraw To Recall First Time Singing

As the interview snippet begins, King asks McGraw a very basic question on how his career started.

“In general, my career?” McGraw said. “Yeah, I mean the first time I remember singing was in Jigger, La., in the middle of a Pentecostal church in the middle of a cotton field. And I sang ‘This Little Light Of Mine’ on stage. I was about 4 years old. That’s the first time I can remember singing.

“But I was an athlete growing up, played baseball, football, basketball,” McGraw said. “But I always sang, always knew every song on the radio. My mom sang a lot around the house.”

King Asks McGraw If He Could Have Played Pro Baseball

King said, “You had the genes of your father, you didn’t know it then.” He is referring to McGraw’s late father, World Series champion pitcher Tug McGraw.

“He was a good athlete all the way around,” Tim McGraw said. “Football player as well.”

“Could you have been a professional baseball player?” Larry King asks.

“My gosh, the older I get the better I was,” McGraw says with both him and King breaking up laughing.

Besides McGraw, other well-known people like Jerry Seinfeld, Jimmy Kimmel, Vin Scully, Alyssa Milano, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Lucy Lawless, former Vice President Al Gore, and Lewis Black paid their respects on social media.

Larry King’s interview style was warm and inquisitive, impressing some people while turning others off. If an interviewer is able to get a person to open up about themselves and their lives, then he or she has done their job. King did it night after night for many years.

His style was uniquely his own. Others, though, probably learned a thing or two from Larry King.

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