WATCH: Jason Momoa Talks with ‘Biggest Fan’ Who is Battling Brain Cancer

by Jennifer Shea
watch-jason-momoa-talks-biggest-fan-battling-brain-cancer

“Aquaman” star Jason Momoa has a very important fan. 

Seven-year-old Danny Sheehan has a rare brain cancer, Comicbook.com reports. And he is currently going through chemotherapy for it.

Momoa Chats With His Fan

A video of Sheehan getting an “Aquaman” action figure recently went viral online. In the clip, the young boy cries out, “Oh my gosh, it’s my favorite one! Aquaman! I love Aquaman!”

The clip eventually made its way to Momoa, who decided to have a FaceTime conversation with his little fan.

Momoa shared a video clip of their conversation on his Instagram account. Entertainment Tonight also tweeted the video.

“I’ve been hearing about you all over from all of my friends,” Momoa said on the call. “And I wanted to call you and say hi and see how you’re doing.”

“I’m doing good,” his fan piped up. Then, “Can I tell you something very important?”

“Yeah,” Momoa replied.

“I love dolphins,” Sheehan said.

“You love dolphins? Have you ever rode on a dolphin?” Momoa asked.

“No, I never have,” Sheehan replied. “And I never seen one before.”

“You’ve never seen one before either?” Momoa said. “We gotta make that happen.”

“Can I show you something?” Sheehan asked.

“Heck yeah,” Momoa said. Then he burst out laughing. “Oh, my goodness!”

Sheehan was brandishing his Aquaman figure. 

Their conversation ended with a discussion of swimming with dolphins and sharks.

In his Instagram post, the actor included a link to Sheehan’s GoFundMe page.

A Harrowing Ordeal

The page details how the Sheehan family’s ordeal began. It all started in 2017 when 4-year-old Danny experienced terrible headaches and vomiting. His family took him to the emergency room, then brought him to Boston Children’s Hospital. He immediately underwent surgery for brain swelling caused by an aggressive and cancerous brain tumor.

Following that, doctors found the cancer had spread to new locations on Danny’s brain and spine. They could only try to slow the cancer’s growth. The next steps were chemotherapy and radiation. 

According to the Mayo Clinic, Sheehan’s condition is very difficult to treat. 

Outsider.com