‘Wheel of Fortune’: Pat Sajak’s Roommate in Vietnam Appeared in Several Major TV Shows

by Josh Lanier
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Pat Sajak wasn’t the only celebrity to serve in his unit during the Vietnam War. The Wheel of Fortune host shared a room with a man who’d become an actor and a Hawaiian news legend.

Sajak wrote about his time in the U.S. Army for the USO. He served as a disc jockey, playing music and news from back home to soldiers on the front lines. It was a job he loved and one where he made a lot of lifelong friends. One of them being Army journalist Joe Moore, whom he roomed with during their time in the Army.

Moore would also return home with a want for show business. He appeared in a few movies and television shows, including Magnum P.I., before finding his true calling. Moore has been a newscaster in Hawaii since returning home in 1969. He currently works for KHON-TV.

The two have remained friends since their time in the military. Sajak still remembers the many quirks of his former roommate. Mostly that he’s a neat freak and sings Mozart and The Rolling Stones at full volume in the shower. Sajak also teased Moore about his inability to adopt and adapt to any technology.

“I went to his house the other day and watched him attempt to change channels with his remote,” the Wheel of Fortune host ribbed his friend for Honolulu Magazine. “It was like watching someone trying to work with a nuclear reactor! I think he still uses a manual typewriter! He thinks black-and-white TV is coming back!”

The two have performed Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple on stage in Hawaii and say they’re similar to their characters. Moore, who calls himself a “Super Felix,” is a “neat freak” Sajak says.

Pat Sajak Felt Bad About ‘Soft Service’ in War

In his article for the USO, Sajak wrote that he used to feel bad that he was given a “soft duty” job, rather than spending any time on the front lines.

“I used to feel a bit guilty about my relatively soft duty. After all, I was billeted in a hotel and there were plenty of nice restaurants around,” Sajak said. “I always felt a little better when I met guys who came into town from the field and thanked us for bringing them a little bit of home. I always thought it strange that they should be thanking me, given what so many of them were going through on a daily basis.”

Sajak says his favorite episodes of Wheel of Fortune feature military families.

“When our troops returned home from war, many were greeted with insults, not cheer. And all too often were portrayed in the media and in Hollywood films as drug addicts, misfits, perpetrators of atrocities, and losers. The reality is that the Vietnam Veterans compiled an outstanding record of courage, service, and patriotism. They should be proud of their record and we should be proud of them.”

Outsider.com