‘Wicked Tuna’: How the Crew Once Saved a Pilot’s Life

by Joe Rutland
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Outsiders that watch “Wicked Tuna” know it shows tuna fishing crews at work. One crew, though, played a role in saving a pilot’s life.

Let’s turn the dial back to the National Geographic Channel show’s first two seasons. The “Christina” with Capt. Kevin Leonowert at the helm found themselves with some extra work to do. An article from Screenrant offered some information about the incident.

So the crew of the “Christina” watched as a pilot and his plane went down in the Atlantic Ocean. It happened about 12 miles from Gloucester, Mass., where captains keep their boats and live.

Yet the pilot actually was “spotting” as a way to look for large schools of fish. Once those are found, then fishermen receive a heads-up from pilots.

‘Wicked Tuna’ Captain, Crew Helped Coast Guard in Saving Pilot

The “Christina” crew was joined by the U.S. Coast Guard to locate and save that plane’s pilot.

All in a day’s work, right? Well, Leonowert and the “Christina” only appeared in the first two seasons of “Wicked Tuna.”

But the show remains popular as viewers tune into the National Geographic Channel. “Wicked Tuna” just finished up airing episodes in its 10th season back in July 2021. The network gave the show a green light for its 11th season.

Those who want to catch up on previous episodes can do so on the show’s website.

Among the captains still on “Wicked Tuna” are Dave Carraro, Paul Hebert, Tyler McLaughlin, TJ Ott, Dave Marciano, and Tim Ott Sr.

Marciano Explained Why Crew Has to Be ‘More Animated’ on Camera

Dave Marciano captains the fishing boat “Hard Merchandise.” There was a time when he and his crew would simply go out there and do their business.

Yet that was before “Wicked Tuna” turned on its cameras and filmed nearly every single step the crew members took.

Marciano, too. The way they do their business in the Atlantic Ocean is a lot different from times before TV stardom.

They used to not talk much; now they talk all the time a camera is on them.

Marciano talked about the shift in working and fishing these days.

“It’s always a challenge,” Marciano said in an interview with Discover Gloucester. “Before ‘Wicked Tuna,’ we were quite reserved when we were fighting fish – we were focused, we wouldn’t say much at all. Once we started filming, we had to learn to become more animated because we were making a television show, and we had to get into the habit of explaining what we’re doing and why we’re doing it.”

Ah, so when they are fishing make sure to watch how this and other crews react on the water.

Outsider.com