February 2022 Social Security Payments: How to Make Sure You Get Your $841 Check

by Victoria Santiago
february-2022-social-security-payments-how-make-sure-you-get-your-841-check-today

Eight million Americans should be receiving their social security payments today, which could reach up to $841. The beneficiaries of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) include disabled children and adults, and seniors over the age of 65.

SSI payments are always sent out on the first of the month. The only exception to that would be if the first of the month fell on a weekend or a national holiday. According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), payments have gone up in 2022. The max SSI payment in 2021 was $794. For this year, that max has gone up to $841. For couples getting social security payments, that total amount could get up to $1,261.

It’s possible that these SSI payments could be delayed. This could happen for a number of reasons, whether it’s due to agency issues or beneficiary issues. For example, if a recipient has not given the SSA their most up-to-date information, their check could easily be delayed. If the office that handles your payments has slowed down its process, then that could also lead to a delay.

Regardless, if you don’t get your payment on the day it’s supposed to be there, don’t panic. Wait at least three mailing days to make sure that your check hasn’t been delayed. If your check still hasn’t arrived by then, you can get in touch with the SSA in a few different ways. The federal agency recommends that you call them at 1–800–772–1213 or visit your local SSA office. However, if those don’t work for you, you can also send in a letter.

Social Security Payments Have Been Increasing, Here’s How You Can Get More

According to The Sun, you can also claim more money if you live in a state that supplements federal SSI income. For example, New York offers people an extra $87 per month for individuals. For couples, that amount goes up to $104. Couples in Alabama can get up to $120 more per month. The amount that you can get varies by state and depends on if your state supplements SSI payments.

To claim this extra money, applicants will need to have their Social Security number, their payroll slips, and other financial documents on hand. Once all of that information is given to the SSA, beneficiaries can expect to get the extra payments electronically.

In addition to that, all social security payments have risen this year thanks to COLA. The cost of living adjustment went into effect last month, and all social security payments saw a 5.9% raise. The average payment amounts have risen from $1,565 to $1,657. Even then, some are starting to worry that this COLA raise – which is the largest in forty years – might not cover living costs. Consumer prices are higher than ever, as is inflation. One Social Security analyst thinks that even though the COLA raise is large, there might be problems down the road. Thus, retirees and anyone depending on social security payments should be extra aware of their finances.

Outsider.com