Naomi Judd Gives Update on Ashley Judd After Severe Leg Injury, 55-Hour Rescue in Jungle

by Halle Ames
Naomi-Judd-Gives-Update-Ashley-Judd-Severe-Leg-Injury-55-Hour-Rescue-Jungle

Naomi Judd, the mother of actress Ashley Judd, gives an update on her daughter’s leg injury that resulted in a 55-hour rescue in the jungle. 

In February, actress Ashley Judd shared her jungle injury that turned into a nightmare. The 52-year-old woman was in the Democratic Republic of the Congo when she broke her left leg in four places. 

Judd says that if it wasn’t for the tireless and heroic efforts of her “Congolese brothers and sisters,” the internal bleeding from the injury would have killed her. 

Country artist Naomi Judd joined Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen on Thursday night. She gave an update on Ashley Judd, who has undergone numerous surgeries in both Congo and the US. 

Naomi said she is proud of her daughter’s fighting spirit. She also explained how her background as a nurse has come in handy while taking care of Ashley Judd. 

“She’s very courageous, and she’s healing. It’s really hard to see her like this,” said the mother. “She lives next door, so I’m gonna go up and take her stitches out when we’re done. I used to be a nurse before I became a singer.”

Naomi Judd also revealed that her other daughter, Ashley’s sister, and country singer, Wynonna Judd lives nearby. 

Wynonna lives over the hill — Wynonna’s right there,” Naomi said. 

Ashley Judd Heals Mind, Body, and Spirit

Outsider staff writer Clayton Edwards reported on Ashley Judd’s Instagram post last week. While speaking about her healing journey, she said she is taking the time to heal all parts of herself. 

“She is not just working on healing her body,” reports Edwards. “In the post, she talks about healing spiritually and mentally as well as physically. It isn’t an easy process, though. In the post, she opens up about her despair and agony.” 

In a lengthy caption, Judd recounts her time at the hospital and those who have helped her along her journey. 

“Now, I am in the bosom of a stream of friends and family, too numerous to mention, who have caught me in their soft arms from this precipitous fall. They do for me what I cannot do for myself – prepare meals, shampoo my hair, and they also offer the deep spiritual direction and consolation of trying to begin to craft an arc of meaning and purpose. They also offer and meet my need for quiet. I am lost, and they are my shepherd’s staff.”

Outsider.com