2020 Tokyo Olympics: Lamont Marcell Jacobs Earns Fastest Man Alive Title After Upset in 100m Final

by Joe Rutland
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Move over, Usain Bolt. Italy’s Lamont Marcell Jacobs became the owner of the “fastest man alive” title at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Jacobs won the men’s 100-meter final in 9.80 seconds for the gold medal, according to The New York Post. He pulled off the upset victory by beating Fred Kerley of Team USA, who won the silver at 9.84 seconds. Andre De Grasse of Canada won the bronze at 9.89 seconds.

At 26 years old, Jacobs is just getting started. American Trayvon Bromell was favored in the men’s 100 yet he didn’t make the final.

2020 Tokyo Olympics Crowns Jacobs With Title Once Held By Bolt

But let’s talk about this “fastest man alive” title Jacobs, who was born in Texas and raised in Italy, now holds after the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. To offer some perspective, let’s look at Bolt’s career.

For starters, this is the first Olympics men’s 100-meter final without Bolt since 2004. Usain Bolt won eight gold medals throughout his Olympic career. He made running the men’s 100 meters look like a walk in the park sometimes against tough competition.

Jacobs really wasn’t even on the track race radar. He finished 19th at the 2019 World Championships. Jacobs was ranked eighth in the world entering the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

In fact, Jacobs never dipped below 10 seconds until earlier in 2021. A former long jump champion in Italy, Jacobs is recreating himself. Now he is the proud owner of the “fastest man alive” crown.

Men’s 100-Meter Champion Was Born In Texas, Yet Family Moved To Italy

He was born in El Paso, Texas. His father was American, while his mother was Italian. His mother moved the family to Italy before Jacobs’ second birthday. Jacobs and his girlfriend live in Rome.

That’s one fine Sunday at the track for Italy at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Yet there also were signs of sportsmanship in Tokyo, too. Sometimes, we get a reminder of what the Tokyo Olympics really are about. That moment came early Sunday in a mostly empty track stadium during a semifinal heat.

The men were in the midst of running the last semifinal of the 800 meters. As American Isaiah Jewett and the rest of the field started home, he touched feet with Nijel Amos of Botswana. Amos was a favorite for gold.

They both fell. So, what do you do in the immediate aftermath as your Tokyo Olympic dreams crash and burn? You help each other up, support each other, and try to finish the race. The two walked with an arm draped across the other.

That’s a fine way to remember how a sad situation turned out at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics for two athletes.

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