Auctioned Mickey Mantle Baseball Card Smashes All-Time Record by Over $1 Million

by Katie Maloney
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A Mickey Mantle baseball card just sold for $5.2 million at auction.

This obliterates the previously held record of $3.94 million set in August by a one-of-one Mike Trout rookie card.

The 1952 #311 Topps Mickey Mantle is considered one of the most desirable trading cards in existence. What makes this particular card so special? Firstly, Mantle is a 20x All-Star and 7x World Series champ. Secondly, 1952 was the first year Topps produced baseball cards. There are very few of these cards that still exist today. In fact, one of the only other cards of its type was sold at auction in 2018 for $2.88 million. This means the card has almost doubled its value in just two years.

Who is the new owner of this prized baseball relic? Rob Gough, owner of the iconic CBD brand, DOPE CBD. Gough celebrated his new purchase on Instagram. Along with a photo of himself holding the card, Gough calls the card ” the Mona Lisa of sports cards.”

Why People Are Choosing To Invest In Mickey Mantle And Other Baseball Cards

We haven’t heard much from the baseball card world since its boom in the 90s. However, 2020 seemed to show a rapid revival of the hobby. Last year alone, three new records were set for the highest value paid for a trading card. The first record was set with a Honus Wagner card going for $900,000. That record was broken later in the year with a LeBron James card that went for $1.8 million. The record was once again broken in September of last year with the aforementioned Honus Wagner card that sold for 3.94 million.

So, why are cards making their revival now? It seems to be more than simply a trend as trading cards have become a highly valuable asset class over the past few years. The PWCC 500 Index, which is basically the S&P 500 for trading cards, reported a 12-year ROI of 175% compared to just 102% for the S&P. In other words, if you invested in both stocks and trading cards 12 years ago, your cards would be worth nearly twice as much today.

In conclusion, you can definitely get into an argument with your partner for making you throw out your baseball cards when you moved in together.

Outsider.com