Charles Woodson Discusses Being ‘Reluctant’ To Go To Green Bay Packers

by Thad Mitchell
charles-woodson-discusses-being-reluctant-green-bay-packers

When it comes to the football field, former National Football League great Charles Woodson has been there and done that.

Throughout his storied career, Woodson has staked his claim as one of the best defensive backs to step on the field. He was a dominant figure from the start of his professional career all the way to the end. His list of accomplishments can stack up against practically anyone.

After winning the Heisman Trophy in 1997 at the University of Michigan, Woodson was the fourth overall draft choice of the Oakland Raiders (now the Las Vegas Raiders). While he was a superstar with the Raiders, most will remember him for his time with the Green Bay Packers. While with the Packers, Woodson went to multiple Pro Bowls and was named the league’s best defensive player in 2009. But, had Woodson had his way, he would have never suited for Green Bay.

Charles Woodson Says Green Bay Wasn’t First Choice

He left the Raiders to join Green Bay after the 2005 season. Speaking with NFL reporter Jim Trotter, Woodson says he was reluctant to sign on to play for the Pack.

“The honesty from Charles Woodson when he discusses how he reluctantly went to Green Bay because the teams he wanted to join were not interested in signing him,” Trotter tweets.

Asked by Trotter how it felt to not be as in demand as he thought he would be, Woodson gives a candid response. The star defender says he put the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Jacksonville Jaguars atop his list of desirable locations. When his free agency didn’t go according to plan, he began to question himself.

“I was crushed, man,” he says. “I said ‘what is it about me? what is being said about me?’ Nobody wanted to touch me.”

The one team that remained in hot pursuit of Woodson was the Green Bay Packers. It wasn’t his first choice but it proved to the right choice.

Woodson was recently selected as NFL Hall-of-Fame finalist in his first year of eligibility for the honor.

Outsider.com