Hall of Fame Pitcher, Atlanta Braves Broadcaster Don Sutton Dies at 75

by Matthew Wilson
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Legendary Hall of Fame Pitcher and Atlanta Braves broadcaster Don Sutton has died. The former MLB pitcher passed away in sleep on Jan. 18.

Sutton’s son confirmed his passing, revealing that his father passed away peacefully. The icon was 75-years-old.

On Twitter, his son Daron Sutton wrote, “Saddened to share that my dad passed away in his sleep last night. He worked as hard as anyone I’ve ever known and he treated those he encountered with great respect…and he took me to work a lot. For all these things, I am very grateful. Rest In Peace.”

In recent years, Sutton has experienced a platitude of health problems. For instance, in 2002 doctors removed one of Sutton’s kidneys after he developed kidney cancer. Just a year later, Sutton also had part of his lung removed as well. In 2019, Sutton suffered a broken leg after a fall.

Don Sutton Was One of the Best

In 1988, Sutton secured his place in the Hall of Fame. But he secured his place in the history books long before that. During his career, Sutton played for five different Major League teams. His career stats were 324 wins, a career 3.26 ERA, and 3,574 strikeouts.

But it was after he left the pitcher’s mound that he became the face of the Atlanta Braves. He started working for the Braves broadcast team in 1989, a role he continued to the present. He also briefly commentated for the Nationals in the late 2000s, as well. From the 1990s through the 2000s, Sutton hosted the Braves’ TV broadcasts with Skip Caray and Pete Van Wieren. He carried this role in addition to his radio broadcasts on the Braves Radio Network.

While his health issues kept him away from radio the past few seasons, Sutton’s love for the game was apparent. Sutton and his signature voice will be missed. The legacy he leaves behind is two-fold, and the Major League and the Braves were better for Sutton having been there.

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