National Dog Show: ‘Kam’ the Poodle Named After Seattle Seahawks Star Kam Chancellor

by Kayla Zadel
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Thanksgiving Day is synonymous with cooking, eating too much, parades, and, of course, the National Dog Show. This pup is receiving the honor of being named after the NFL Star Kam Chancellor.

The show must go on and that’s exactly what the National Dog Show is doing. The best of the best canines come from around the country to prance in front of judges and receive top honors. The poodle might be in the non-sporting group but that didn’t stop its owner from naming it after an athlete.

The poodle “Kam” is named after the former Seattle Seahawk’s Defensive Back Kam Chancellor.

The broadcasters say that the poodle is athletic and that the name fits him because of his stature.

Kam Chancellor and Others are Loving the Nod

Kam Chancellor is loving that this poodle is named after him. He writes, “Kam doing what he does best!!!” Though Kam the poodle didn’t win Best in Show, he did put on a good performance.

Though Kam the poodle didn’t win Best in Show, he did put on a good performance. Claire, the 3-year-old Scottish Deerhound takes home the top honors. Furthermore, she comes from a winning family. Claire’s grandmother, Hickory, became the first Scottish Deerhound to win Best in Show at Westminster in 2011. Additionally, Claire’s mother, Chelsea, won second place at the 2015 National Dog Show.

The National Dog Show is one of the most well known dog shows worldwide. The dog show was founded in 1879 and has been held annually since 1933. Plus it’s hosted by the Kennel Club of Philadelphia.

This year, because of the pandemic, the National Dog Show will be held following strict guidelines. That means no spectators, vendors, sponsors, or media. Judging will be done following strict safety guidelines, including social distancing, wearing masks, and monitoring temperatures of all participants.

The competition will be limited to 600 dogs, a 70% decrease from the nearly 2,000 who compete in a regular year.

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