Stimulus Checks: VP Mike Pence Says White House Wants a Second Round

by Hunter Miller
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As millions of Americans eagerly await financial aid from the government, Mike Pence says the White House still hopes to deliver a second round of stimulus checks. The Vice President spoke out about the issue during an interview on Friday.

While making an appearance on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street,” Pence reaffirmed the White House’s commitment to sending more payments. “Nobody wants to give direct payments to American families more than President Donald Trump,” Pence said. “We sent those checks to American families. It helped people through this tough time.”

Back in March, Congress passed the Cares Act. The bill mandated that qualifying American indivuals receive a $1,200 check. As for married couples, the payments came in the amount of $2,400. Furthermore, the bill provided for up to $500 per child.

What Would a Second Round of Stimulus Checks Look Like?

According to Mark Mazur, the director of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, Congress may deliver another round of payments in the same amount.

“You could easily see another round of stimulus checks that was exactly the same as the previous round, or more or less the same,” said Mazur, CNBC reports.

Some financial experts warn Americans not to expect payments any time soon. Given the delays in Congress, a potential second round of stimulus checks may not come until October or possibly later.

Bill Hoagland, the senior vice president at the Bipartisan Policy Center, explains the 2020 election may provide incentive to pass a bill before November.

“Politically, some of the people in the White House might think it’s a good thing to get a check signed by Donald Trump right before the election,” Hoagland said.

In order to receive payments, individuals need to file tax returns prior to the IRS issued Oct. 15 deadline. Those with their direct deposit information on file likely stand a better chance to receive the payments first.

[H/T CNBC]

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