John Deere Strike: Watch 10,000 Workers Protest, Demand Higher Pay

by Clayton Edwards
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10,000 John Deere factory employees across the country are on strike today. The labor stoppage affects workers in Iowa, Illinois, and Kansas. In solidarity with their fellow union members, they walked away from their positions at the stroke of midnight Thursday morning. Since then, many social media users and local residents have spoken up in support. Today, the country’s eyes are on Deere’s employees as they walk into the third nationwide strike currently affecting American workers.

According to the United Auto Workers’ Union,  John Deere employees took to the picket line after the company failed to make an offer that met the union’s demands and needs. Chuck Browning, VP and director of UAW’s Agricultural Implement Department spoke out about the stoppage. He said, “Our members at John Deere strike for the ability to earn a decent living, retire with dignity, and establish fair work rules.” The union will continue to try to come to an agreement with the corporation.

In an ABC report, one John Deere employee explained the reason for the strike. He said that the wage increase the company offered wasn’t enough. Additionally, he said that Deere plans to eliminate pensions for future employees. This strike, they say, is for future employees as well as current ones.

Footage From the John Deere Strike

This is the first time John Deere employees have gone on strike since 1986 and the world is taking notice. As a result, some folks are capturing videos so we can get a look at the picket line.

In the video, we can see that there aren’t many employees on the picket line and everyone seems fairly calm. The last John Deer strike went on for over 150 days. So, they’re settling in for the long haul.

Jonah Furman shared this video with his Twitter followers. It shows the picket line at a John Deer plant in Iowa. In the video, a trucker refuses to cross the line and either pick up from or deliver to the plant.

The company can hire non-union workers in an attempt to replace those who are on strike. However, this show of solidarity throws a monkey wrench in the plant’s supply chain. Businesses of all sizes across America are already experiencing supply chain issues. In fact, some major corporations have gone on hiring sprees to combat those issues. So, this added hitch may put more pressure on John Deere to speed up their negotiations.

Only time will tell how this one turns out. The strike is in its early stages and could go on for months.

Outsider.com