New York To Ban Sale of Gas-Powered Cars and Trucks By 2035

by Amy Myers
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Looking to get a new car? If you’re in New York, your choices might be more limited than usual soon. By 2035, the state will no longer allow the sale of gas-powered vehicles to reduce the impact of greenhouse gas emissions. Last week, Governor Kathy Hochul announced the initiative and signed the new legislation.

“New York is implementing the nation’s most aggressive plan to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions affecting our climate and to reach our ambitious goals, we must reduce emissions from the transportation sector, currently the largest source of the state’s climate pollution,” Governor Hochul said in the news release.

That leaves commuters with the option of electric cars or public transportation. Alternatively, for those that don’t have to fare the highways, electric scooters or bikes might be the more popular option.

“The new law and regulation mark a critical milestone in our efforts and will further advance the transition to clean electric vehicles while helping to reduce emissions in communities that have been overburdened by pollution from cars and trucks for decades,” the New York governor continued.

Governor Hochul’s signed document still needs approval from state legislation. Should it pass, New York’s streets might see more charging stations and higher gas prices in the future.

“Under the new law, new off-road vehicles and equipment sold in New York are targeted to be zero-emissions by 2035, and new medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles by 2045,” Governor Hochul added.

New York Follow California’s Lead on Gas-Powered Ban

New York isn’t the only state to declare war against gas-powered vehicles. This time last year, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order banning the sale of these vehicles by 2035. In addition, medium- and heavy-duty gas-powered vehicles will see the same ban by 2045. The governor stated that this effort is to support the state’s green initiative. With more electric cars on the roads, the state hopes to reduce its “reliance on climate change-causing fossil fuels.”

Meanwhile, Governor Newsom claimed in his release that the new legislation will create more jobs and support economic growth.

“This is the most impactful step our state can take to fight climate change,” said Governor Newsom. “For too many decades, we have allowed cars to pollute the air that our children and families breathe. Californians shouldn’t have to worry if our cars are giving our kids asthma. Our cars shouldn’t make wildfires worse – and create more days filled with smoky air. Cars shouldn’t melt glaciers or raise sea levels threatening our cherished beaches and coastlines.”

Unlike New York’s legislation, Governor Newsom’s does not require approval from Congress. As it stands, the ban will go into effect in 14 years. However, it does not prevent current gas-powered vehicle owners from selling their cars privately or on the used car market.

Outsider.com