See Melania Trump’s Latest Dress She Debuted During Sickle Cell Event That Costs $945

by Matthew Wilson
See Melania Trump's Latest Dress She Debuted During Sickle Cell Event That Costs $945

First Lady Melania Trump showed off her latest dress at a roundtable discussion. The first lady hosted a socially-distanced event to raise awareness for sickle cell disease on Monday (Sept. 14).

Trump hosted the event in the State Dining Room at The White House. The discussion comes a few weeks since her husband President Donald Trump recognized September as Sickle Cell Disease Awareness Month.

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Melania Trump wore a $945 white dress and sky-high orange stilettos to the event. Fashion company Max Mara designed the belted midi dress in Italy. The dress consists of stretched wool, fully lined with a single vent in the back. The company sold out of the dress, which comes with a removable woven belt.

She also wore two platinum and diamond bands with her signature smokey eyeshadow and pink lipstick.

The first lady’s stylish new look comes after people online ridiculed her Republican National Convention attire late last month. Trump ended up a meme online when people realized her lime green dress matched the color of a green screen. Afterwards, users edited and overlaid coronavirus death tolls, immigration detention centers and a political endorsement for Democrat candidate Joe Biden onto the dress.

Melania Trump discussed sickle cell disease research.

Trump discussed research for the disease with researchers, patients and medical professionals. Despite sickle cell disease causing a compromised immune system, few people wore masks at the event including Trump herself.

In 2018, President Trump signed the Sickle Cell Disease and Other Heritable Blood Disorders Research, Surveillance, Prevention, and Treatment Act into law. This Act subsequently authorized research initiatives into prevention and treatment of the disease.

On average, sickle cell disease affects about 100,000 people in the United States. A disproportionate number of African Americans and Hispanics are affected. The disease is an umbrella term for a group of inherited conditions that affect a red blood cell’s performance.

As a result, people with sickle cell disease normally don’t live beyond age 60. Current treatment focuses on alleviating symptoms such as pain and infections.

[H/T: Daily Mail]

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