U.S. Submarine Damaged in Pacific Ocean Underwater Collision

by Joe Rutland
us-submarine-struck-pacific-ocean-underwater-collision

A United States Navy submarine suffered severe damage after a collision took place in the Western Pacific Ocean, it was announced on Thursday.

According to an article from USNI News, the USS Connecticut, a Seawolf-class nuclear attack submarine, is recovering from a collision on Oct. 2. It is currently returning to port as part of the U.S. 7th Fleet. A U.S. Pacific Fleet spokesman confirms this on Thursday with USNI News.

Capt. Bill Clinton said that the submarine “struck an object while submerged on the afternoon of Oct. 2.” The collision happened in international waters within the Indo-Pacific region, he said.

Submarine Collision Did Not Result In Life-Threatening Injuries Aboard

“The safety of the crew remains the Navy’s top priority,” Clinton said. He adds that there were no life-threatening injuries from the collision.

“The submarine remains in a safe and stable condition,” he said. “USS Connecticut’s nuclear propulsion plant and spaces were not affected and remain fully operational. The extent of damage to the remainder of the submarine is being assessed.”

Meanwhile, Clinton adds that there’s been no request for assistance from the U.S. Navy and that the incident is under investigation.

U.S. Navy Stated That USS Connecticut Deployed For Duty To Pacific Ocean In May

Subsequently, Outsiders, the submarine from the Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton, Wash., deployed for the Pacific Ocean on May 27. That’s what the U.S. Navy announced at that time.

The U.S. Navy released photos of the USS Connecticut submarine operating in the Western Pacific. It had port calls in late July and August in Japan. Reportedly, U.S. 7th Fleet Commander Adm. Karl Thomas visited the USS Connecticut in August.

First, this submarine is the fifth United States ship with Connecticut as its name since 1776. Second, in one of the submarine’s more interesting situations, a polar bear visits during a stop. The USS Connecticut visits the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station in April 2003.

Finally, it surfaces through the ice, only to have a polar bear come along and gnaw at its rudder. The polar bear, though, loses interest and goes away.

Earlier In October, Navy Jet Crashed Into National Park Located In California

October has been a bit of a rough month for the U.S. Navy.

Back on Oct. 6, a report states that a U.S. Navy jet crashed into a national park in California. It caused the entire jet to suffer damages but the pilot did eject before it smashed into the earth.

According to a report from Fox News, the F/A-18F Super Hornet jet did crash into California’s Death Valley National Park in the afternoon hours. The pilot suffers minor injuries and visits a Las Vegas hospital, where he was treated and released.

Outsider.com