Zipline Employee Sacrifices Himself Saving Woman Stranded on Line 100ft Above Ground

by Michael Freeman
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Though an exciting hobby to engage in, ziplining presents an obvious set of risks that accompany it. Sadly, people falling and becoming stranded can happen. This week, a man helped prevent the former by paying the ultimate price. In a truly heroic feat, one zipline employee sacrificed his life to save a woman stranded on the line 100 feet above the ground.

Joaquin Romero was a 34-year-old zipline employee working in California and heroically sacrificed himself to save the stranded woman. While he worked at La Jolla Zip Zoom Zipline on the La Jolla Indian Reservation, a woman slid out on the line while Romero was helping her get hooked on it. He then grabbed her harness to try and pull her back but got dragged away too.

Fox 8 reports the pair ended up 100 feet above the ground after sliding. The zipline can hold up to 250 pounds. An anonymous friend of Romero’s told the news outlet he feared their combined weight would cause them both to fall, so he let go before that could happen.

Romero dropped the full 100 feet and suffered from major trauma upon landing. Cal Fire quickly rescued him with a low-angle rope system and pulled him to the roadside. Paramedics airlifted him to Sharp Memorial Hospital, but he died Monday morning. The woman remained unharmed.

La Jolla Zip Zoom Zipline released a statement on the incident, expressing sorrow and condolences to Romero’s family. The organization goes on to say they are investigating the matter with federal and state authorities.

Military Veterans Install Memorial at High School Where 10 of its Graduates Served and Died for our Country

Joaquin Romero’s actions are as selfless as it gets, much like what our country’s law enforcement, first responders, and military do for our country. Last month, a group of veterans honored 10 high school graduates who went to serve and died for our country.

Simi Valley High School in California honored these 10 Vietnam veterans last month with a monument and a ceremony. Fittingly, veterans helped build the monument. Bruce Dobin spoke to ABC 7 and dislikes the fact no one really recognizes Vietnam heroes. “No one really admitted and praised the alumni who graduated from Simi High School who were killed in Vietnam.”

Besides the new monument, the school honored the soldiers with a ceremony on September 10. Another veteran named Bruce Hellebrand told ABC about customizing the monument and really making it special. “It’s even more important to put together a monument for Simihai graduates decades ago. Each plaque has a plaque attached to it, and each plaque is engraved with 10 names.”

Outsider.com