West Virginia Coal Miners Rescue Stranded Couple Whose Electric Vehicle Died

by Taylor Cunningham
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When a couple’s electric car ran out of power in the middle of a major traffic jam last week, a group of West Virginia coal miners appropriately came to the rescue.

The Washington DC residents were on their way to a weekend vacation when the car’s power cut off on Corridor H in Tucker County. The area is infamous for grid block traffic from 18-wheelers driving to and from Alliance Coal Company. But the group just happened to be available to help.

The miners, including Andrew Smith and Daniel House, joined West Virginia State Sen. Randy Smith (R) on Fox and Friends to chat about the “ironic” situation.

“That’s just not a good place to be,” House said, recognizing that the spot could have been dangerous. “So we had to figure out a way to get them out.”

Because the car was near Alliance Coal Company, one of the workers was able to radio over to his friends for more help. And five people showed up to help the driver push his car to the guard shack. Once there, the couple was able to charge their vehicle and get back on the road.

Coal Miners Asks People Not to ‘Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth’

Host Steve Doocy noted that the mining profession is under heavy scrutiny as of late. Many activists have been lobbying to reduce the need for miners, despite the push for electric vehicles. And the rescuers admitted that they’ve felt met a lot of negativity due to that belief. So being able to save a couple coming from the US capital makes for an interesting story.

“It was pretty ironic… to be plugged into a coal mine,” State Sen. Smith laughed. “You can’t make this stuff up… We had some good conversations, we’re still laughing about it.” 

The miners admitted that they don’t know the couple’s politics, so they can’t say whether or not they believed the stigmas about the mining profession. Nonetheless, Andrew gave them a “Friends of Coal” license plate souvenir to help them remember their adventure.

The workers added that it’s important not to “look a gift horse in the mouth.” Because as Doocy noted, most eclectic car owners don’t realize that their power actually comes from a mine.

Furthermore, the group of coal miners has a very specific message for people reading the story.

“I do know sometimes coal miners have a bad rap,” House added. “And we just wanna show [that] we have a heart and we’re good people.”

Outsider.com