‘Yellowstone’ Horses Evacuated Due to Hurricane Ida

by Amy Myers
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Yellowstone takes care of all of its cast members – even the ones with hooves. While Hurricane Ida made its way toward the States, handlers of the famed equines searched for a safe place to keep them until the storm passed. That’s how they found Silver Creek Equestrian Center further north in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

“[Silver Creek] is on a couple of different websites for horse hotels,” owner Laura Leigh Dorman told The Vicksburg Post. “The crew called and said they were working on a film and had to get their horses out of New Orleans, so we said ‘Come on.'”

So, the farm opened its stable doors to the nine Yellowstone horses from the California-based training company, Gentle Jungle, renowned for its work with film and TV star animals. Dorman knew that her coming guests were famous, but it wasn’t until the crew arrived that she realized just how impressive a rap sheet they had.

“They started listing all these movies they had done with the horses, and I was blown away,” Dorman shared. “Little did I know, they do all these movies.”

Besides Yellowstone, the horses that came to Silver Creek were also stars in Jumanji, Titanic, Gladiator, Forrest Gump, Dances with Wolves, Out of Africa, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. With all of the work that these stars have done, the handlers should consider starting animal Oscars.

Unfortunately, the Yellowstone stars’ visit didn’t last very long. On Thursday, the crew was off again to a new, undisclosed location to work on another film. At least now Dorman can rewatch some of the horses’ films and shows and see her guests on the big screen.

‘Yellowstone’ Star Details What it’s Like Working with Horses on Set

American comedian W.C. Fields once said, “Never work with children or animals,” the reason being that they’re unpredictable and hard to instruct. However, the horses on Yellowstone are proving this remark wrong.

Star Cole Hauser plays Rip Wheeler on the popular TV drama and works closely with the show’s four-legged cast members. He admitted that the hardest part about working with the horses wasn’t their unpredictability, but rather having to sit on top of them during an especially cold December day of filming, “freezing to death.”

“The horse is shaking, and you’re shaking with it. Waiting for them to say ‘action,'” Hauser told Cinema Blend.

According to the Yellowstone star, the horses are always the first ones ready to shoot the next scene.

“The horses that we’re on are just A++, they’re amazing horses, and we don’t wait on them,” the Yellowstone actor said. “It’s them usually waiting on either the director or the camera operators or something like that getting things set, but these horses that we’re on are fantastic.”

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