‘Yellowstone’ Star Jen Landon Talks People Being Surprised by Her Natural Speaking Voice

by Courtney Blackann
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Much like Kelly Reilly of “Yellowstone,” Jen Landon (Teeter) also has a very surprising real voice. And just like Kelly Reilly, fans don’t recognize Teeter when the actress who plays her is out in public. That’s because she’s incredibly articulate and, sorry fans, she’s actually not from Texas.

In a new interview with co-star Jefferson White of the Yellowstone Official Podcast, Landon says how funny it is that fans would never guess she’s the buffalo-riding-loud-mouthed Texan she appears as on the series.

“People are surprised by that. They’re also surprised when someone’s been speaking to me for an hour and they find out I’m Teeter, because I visually don’t register to them as Teeter. They then ask me how long it takes for makeup to put the prosthetics on my face – I then have to inform them that I have no prosthetics on my face. That is just my face,” Landon laughs.

Teeter is known for her thick, southern accent. It’s one of the comedic points of the otherwise serious drama series. She’s rough and tumble through and through. But that’s one of reasons we’ve all come to love her so much.

Further, Landon’s character has grown immensely in the fourth season of “Yellowstone.” She’s not only proved herself as one of the Bunkhouse Boys. She’s shown John Dutton that she’s willing to accept the brand and all it comes with. This is demonstrated when John fires the girls and tells Rip, “no more girls in the bunkhouse.”

However, after Teeter makes a plea to John, showing her more sincere side, he and Rip grant her the opportunity to stay.

Jen Landon says Teeter Gives Her Courage

Additionally, Jen Landon explains how she connects with her character and how, while she’s rough around the edges, Teeter givers her courage.

“I do feel like Teeter’s courage gives me courage,” Landon explained. “That’s something that we all experience as actors playing different parts. We sort of take on their mental state.”

She goes on to say that:

“But also as an actor, we really get a false sense of confidence. For example, I’m under the impression that I’m an incredibly good fighter who can beat up an entire biker gang. Because [stunt coordinator Jason Rodriguez] choreographed a fight in which I win. But I cannot do that. But I think I can,” Landon concluded.

In addition to learning how to play the part of the tough Texan, Landon says she had to wing it a bit when it came to riding horses. And she may have over-exaggerated her experience.

“When I auditioned for the show, they reached out to my team and asked if I had horse riding experience. And I informed my team that I had ridden horses as a child, but not since then. And they told casting that I was a professional horseback rider,” Landon said

She adds that she overcame a certain fear working with horses on set.

“So coming in, I actually had a lot of horse fear, ’cause I did grow up with horses,” the Yellowstone star explained. “My mom had a really, really bad fall, and was dragged around an arena with her foot stuck in a stirrup. And she really shouldn’t have survived that, and I was still quite young. But that was the end of horseback riding, so I didn’t really get to reclaim that until joining the show. It was really healing on one level.”

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