‘Yellowstone’ TV: Lloyd Actor Forrie J. Smith Shares Stunning Photos of His ‘Office’ and ‘Office Staff’

by Jennifer Shea
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On “Yellowstone,” Lloyd actor Forrie J. Smith has become a fan favorite, with fans quoting his best lines and flocking to his social media posts. And on Thursday night, Smith gave them more material, posting a picture of himself and three fellow cowboys out beneath a beautiful blue sky.

“Office staff: Wilder Chuck Muncy and Paul Summers!” Smith wrote on Instagram. The picture shows him and his three grinning helpers, one of them on a horse.

Smith Is a Native Montanan

The great outdoors was part of Smith’s upbringing. Smith grew up in Helena, Montana, not too far from where “Yellowstone” is filmed. He was raised in the rodeo lifestyle, he told Good Housekeeping in 2019, so he certainly didn’t need to go to Cowboy Camp, as some of the newbies joining the cast did.

But that doesn’t mean “Yellowstone” is a breeze for Smith, either. He still puts considerable effort into crafting the character of Lloyd.

“I have lived the experiences that this show is based on, like when Jimmy won his first belt buckle earlier in season 2,” he told Good Housekeeping. “Even though I fall back on my own stories, I still have to act. I still have to hit my mark.”

Smith believes firmly that ranchers help feed this country, and ranches serve a greater purpose than just making money. All the same, he also understands John Dutton’s (Kevin Costner) ruthless attitude about protecting the Dutton Ranch.

“When you grow up on a ranch, you grow up with life and death,” he said. “Anything detrimental to the ranch or our way of life is an enemy and needs to be taken care of one way or another.”

‘Yellowstone’ Actor Releases New Bourbon

Smith recently partnered with Texas-based brewers Oak and Eden to launch his own line of bourbon whiskey. Capitalizing on his newfound fame as Lloyd to aid a good cause, Smith will be donating a portion of each sale to the Children’s Shriner Hospitals.

The hospitals care for children with specialized orthopedic problems, spinal cord injuries, burns, cleft lip and palate conditions, whether or not their families are able to pay for their treatment. Kids have access to free care up to age 18, and in some cases, age 21.

Smith calls his new 116-proof product “a bold cowboy coffee-infused bourbon.” It is part of Oak and Eden’s Anthro Series, an effort to enlist celebrities in the liquor-making business. Also participating in the Anthro Series is professional skier Kina Pickett, who worked with Oak and Eden on a 90-proof bourbon whiskey.

Outsider.com