2020 RV Sales Headed Through The Roof

by Jack T. Wilder

During the Covid-19 lockdown this spring RV might have stood for Rested Vacationer or Reluctant Visitor but no longer! Recreational Vehicles, Campers and Trailers of all stripes and sizes are doing big business all over the country. As camping within a few hundred miles of home has become the popular summer past-time this year, a lot of folks are buying the RV of their dreams and packing up the kids for some time in the woods or at the beach.

At Bell Camper Sales in Bartlesville, Oklahoma sales have hit a high this year, said third-generation owner Lane Bell this week to a reporter from the Examiner-Enterprise. “The RV industry all over the country is booming right now,” he said. “We’ve sold just shy of 100 in the last two months. Sales are normally 60 to 70. There is a decent chance that this will be the best year ever.”

When RV makers closed their plants in early spring because of the virus, it looked like the industry might crash. But a month later, RV makers started operating again and the industry was caught off guard with the demand.

Sales of Recreational Vehicles “are off the chart,” said Robert Zagami, of the New England RV Dealers Association to the New Hampshire Business Review. “No one forecast it; no one predicted it.”

The steady rise in demand is likely a direct result of the virus pandemic as many vacation areas forced people to opt for closer to home alternatives.

However, some people are buying RVs for more important reasons than camping. Some essential healthcare workers are living in the RVs to self-isolate from family, and some people have moved their offices inside them to work safely away from home.

Prices on a camper range all over the board depending on if you’re buying one new or used. Your best bet is to shop around and do a search online for the best prices. You might get lucky and find your neighbor is selling his right down the street.

Either way, it’s big business for the industry across the full spectrum during a time when many other companies are struggling to stay afloat.

Outsider.com