4-Year-Old Reels In Potential World Record Golden Trout in Wyoming

by Jennifer Shea
4-year-old-reels-in-potential-world-record-golden-trout-wyoming

A 4-year-old girl caught a potential world record golden trout in Wyoming last week.

Caroline May Evans landed a monster of a golden trout recently. And the 4-year-old angler has potentially set the IGFA Female Smallfry Record for the species.

The International Game Fish Association (IGFA) announced as much this Saturday on Twitter.

“Caroline May Evans, Age 4, recently submitted an application for this 0.92-kg (2-pound) golden trout,” the association tweeted. “Caroline was fishing in Wyoming. After a quick fight and weighing, she was able to safely release the fish.”

4-Year-Old May Have Set World Record

The IGFA has a Smallfry category for boys 10 or younger and a category for girls 10 or younger. The kids have to follow all IGFA international angling rules. There’s one exception. Fish do not have to be weighed on land, per USA Today.

Meanwhile, the IGFA’s adult world record for golden trout is an 11-pound fish caught by Chas Reed at Cooks Lake, Wyoming in 1948.

The golden trout is native to California. But it also lives in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Washington and Wyoming, according to KTVB.

More About the IGFA

Besides making a 4-year-old’s day, the IGFA has a comprehensive list of angling-related missions to attend to.

Founded in 1939, the IGFA is a nonprofit group devoted to the conservation of game fish and the advancement of ethical angling practices. It pursues these goals through science, education, rule-making, record keeping and recognition of outstanding achievements in angling.

The IGFA is possibly the premier authority on game fish and angling matters in the world. It tracks world records, sets angling rules, educates young anglers and furthers conservation goals. Among the latter is the restoration of the Everglades and Florida Bay.

The organization also oversees the Fishing Hall of Fame. And it dispenses annual awards and catch certificates.

The Florida-based nonprofit relies on contributions and grants for the bulk of its revenue, according to financial statements. It had over $22.5 million in net assets by 2019. That’s the last year for which it has posted financial reports.   

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