Alaska Homeowner ‘Scared Half to Death’ After Walking Out Front Door to Find Moose: VIDEO

by Caitlin Berard
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For most of us, opening the front door might mean seeing a squirrel or rabbit. Maybe even a herd of cows, depending on which part of the country where you live. For those who live in Alaska, however, anything from a bear to a wolf to a full-grown moose could be waiting outside the door.

A homeowner in Fairbanks, Alaska, experienced such a sighting back in March. The homeowner, Emily Banks, had just prepared her morning cup of coffee when she spotted a “young calf moose” standing serenely next to her front porch.

Of course, no one expects to find a 500 pound animal on their porch first thing in the morning. “It scared me half to death,” Banks said, according to Yahoo.

Though moose aren’t usually aggressive, it’s always wise to exercise caution around young animals. If the mother is nearby and perceives you as a threat, even the most peaceful species can become vicious.

That said, the young moose was simply “too adorable not to take a short video,” Banks explained. With what was obviously extreme care, Emily Banks peeked around the door frame to capture the moment with her phone. “I pressed record and stuck my hand outside my door,” Banks said. “And the sweet thing just said hello with those adorable eyes.”

Snowmobilers Rescue Moose From Frozen Creek in Alaska

Earlier this year, Andrew Koerner and Terry White were snowmobiling in Anchorage, Alaska, when they spotted a moose trapped in a frozen creek. Unwilling to drive away knowing the animal would continue to suffer, the friends worked together to dig it out.

It took more than an hour, but the pair were eventually able to carve an eight-foot-wide hole around the moose, giving it enough room to escape. Though Koerner and White did a lot of the work themselves, several passersby pitched in along the way. One even used a sledgehammer he happened to have on hand to break the ice apart.

“You could just tell by his eyes that he was just so ready to get out of that hole,” Koerner told a local news station. “That’s when me and Terry looked at each other and were like, ‘we’re not going to leave until this little guy is out of this hole.'”

The moose was thin, with a great deal of fur missing from the back of its neck, indicating that it had been trapped and struggling to escape for at least a couple of days. “He was definitely not happy, but we let him calm down,” Koerner recalled. “I mean, he was breathing heavily when we first got there.”

After rescuing the animal from what would have no doubt turned into a deadly situation, Koerner said, “it felt amazing, it felt great.”

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