Bobcat Caught in Rare Video Hunting Down Bird on Golf Course Bunker: VIDEO

by Amanda Glover
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Somedays, we just crave something specific for lunch. Based on the video, this bobcat can’t seem to let go of the thought of chowing down on a fresh bird.

In a recent video caught on an Arizona golf course, viewers can see the mammal with its eye on a family of either duck or geese. The pointy-eared creature hid in the sand while his oblivious lunch choices all stuck together.

On Friday, several golfers at Silverleaf Country Club in Scottsdale witnessed the wild scene. TMZ was the first to share the video with fascinated fans. You can view the video here.

“Look at this,” a woman says in the video. “They don’t even know he’s there.”

Once the bobcat decided it was time to attack, he charged for the clueless birds. Unfortunately for him, they all took off for the sky before he would pick the best piece for lunch—or so we thought in the first 40 seconds.

After a group of birds managed to escape, the camera pans to the bobcat comfortably lying on the grass chewing on a bird. Then, he picks up his prize and scurries off into nature.

Apparently, the unexpected scene didn’t stop the golfers from continuing their game. According to an Instagram user, the game continued after the animals vanished.

Solitary Bobcats Managed to be Captured in One Image

Fun fact about Bobcats, they are extremely solitary and territorial creatures. Due to this and the fact that they’re mainly nocturnal animals, we rarely see them in person. Although they’re active throughout the year, they sleep in closed spaces during the day.

Although not very vocal, the mammals know when to make their voices heard when mating season is upon them. When that time comes, there’s no shortage of hissing, screaming, spitting, and howling. But if these animals are so shy, why would they be grouped together?

On December 27, 2021, Ohio resident, Bill West took a picture of five bobcats together camouflaged in the leaves. His daughter, Kimberly Murnieks was happy to discuss on Twitter why these solitary creatures stuck together.

“ODNR’s wildlife biologist confirmed that this fantastic image is a momma bobcat & four kittens born in the spring. The offspring typically stay with mom for 9-12 months. Other than that, bobcats are solitary. It’s a wonderful pic – my Dad is amazed at how many people love it,” she says.

After becoming fascinated with the picture as well, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources shared it to all their social media accounts, as well.

“Pretty cool to see 5 bobcats in one pic! A big thanks to Ohio Office of Budget & Management Director Kimberly Murnieks who recently shared this pic on Twitter which was taken on her Dad’s (Bill West) trail cam in Washington County – Warren Township on Christmas Eve,” the department captioned on their Facebook.

Sounds like this picture was a once-in-a-lifetime capture. Likely, witnessing a bobcat pick its lunch out of a flock of birds is one, too!

Outsider.com