Camel Escapes Kansas Nativity Scene Before Leading Cops on 24 Hour Chase

by Jennifer Shea
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That’ll teach them to keep live animals in their nativity scene. In a romp you have to see to believe, a camel busted loose from the Agriculture Hall of Fame’s live nativity scene in Bonner Springs, Kansas, and took a tour of the town.

Police officers told WDAF-TV Kansas City that the camel’s halter had broken. The camel then made a bid for freedom before its handlers had a chance to spot the halter malfunction.

Watch a video of the animal cruising through a local golf course here:

Animal Control Officers Lasso Camel

On Sunday, Bonner Springs police and animal control officers chased the fugitive camel through the Sunflower Hills Golf Course. From there, they followed it into the woods, down the highway, and along Kansas Avenue near the McDonald’s and Walmart outposts.

“We learned that camels can run 40 mph,” Sgt. Heather Pate, a public information officer for the police department, told the Kansas City Star.

The officers finally managed to lasso the camel at around 1:30 p.m. They then returned the camel to the owner, who had kept it tied up at the live nativity scene.

“Officers took to the golf courses in pursuit of the camel (on golf carts no less),” the Bonner Springs Police Department recounted in a Facebook post. “Officers and Animal Control were finally able to catch up to the camel in the 600 block of North Nettleton Avenue where it was safely ‘taken into custody’ by lasso!”

“The camel was reunited with its owners and will go back to doing camel things,” the police added.

Last Month, Camels Escaped from a Circus in Madrid

Meanwhile, in November, a handful of camels and a llama broke free from the Gran Circo Quiros in Madrid. The animals roamed the streets of the city for several hours.

The circus alleged that animal rights advocates had cut the fence that was penning the animals in, possibly in an act of sabotage, the New York Daily News reported.

The circus manager, Mati Munoz, told Agence France-Presse that the same animal rights group protests his circus every year. Of course, that necessarily doesn’t prove the group was responsible for the cut fence.

“Police found them and took care of [the animals] so they could [return] safe and sound,” the Spanish national police force posted to Twitter.

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