Bizarre Doomsday Conspiracy About the World Ending on Sep. 24 Goes Viral on TikTok

by Taylor Cunningham
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Be sure to live your best lives today, folks. Because if a new, bizarre doomsday conspiracy is true, the world will end tomorrow.

Of course, it’s unlikely that humans will cease to exist on September 24. We’ve seen several world-ending conspiracies hit headlines over the past few decades—think 12/21/12, 11/11/11, and the dawn of the new millennium—and we’re still here. But as always, the possibility gets people chattering. And that is exactly what’s happening on TikTok right this moment.

The recent theory began when Friedrich Metz, a member of the German Parliament, addressed his colleagues with a cryptic message, and a video of his speech made it to Twitter.

“This 24th of September, 2022, will be a day that remains in our memory as a day we say, ‘I remember exactly where I was,'” he says.

That video promptly began circulating on social media sites, unsurprisingly leading people to make wild assumptions. One such assumption that has gained a lot of traction is that a giant solar flare is due to hit Earth, cause several tropical cyclones, make the power grid go down, and result in perilous, widespread mass destruction.

Sounds an awful lot like the plot of Knowing. Has anyone called Nicolas Cage?

NASA Says Solar Flares Aren’t Cause For a Doomsday Conspiracy

According to NASA and some deep internet digging, there doesn’t seem to be any proof that justifies this idea, however.

NASA says that a solar flare is “an intense burst of radiation coming from the release of magnetic energy associated with sunspots.” From Earth, the events appear as bright areas o the sun and last from a few minutes to a few hours.

The organization explains that when they happen, the worst-case scenario is they shift signal transmissions from satellites into the upper atmosphere. And it has no reason to believe that’s dangerous.

Furthermore, Lead Stories claims that Metz misspoke when he said “September 24.” The video in question was reportedly recorded on February 27th, just after Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24. And he was actually speaking of that event.

Nonetheless, the possibility that we’ll all be living in a post-apocalyptic world in a few days will be making waves on social media for the next 48 hours or so. And we’ll admit, it’s fun to click through the posts and get drawn into the hysteria.

However, we feel fairly confident that you’ll still be reading our stories on September 25th. Obviously, it can’t hurt to tell your friends and family that you love them, just in case. But we think we’ll get to live through many more doomsday conspiracy theories. If we’re wrong, though, who will be around to tell us any different?

Outsider.com