Black Bear Caught on Camera Ringing Doorbell, Hanging Out on Family’s Porch: VIDEO

by Emily Morgan
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One family got a surprise they never expected when they saw a black bear hanging out on their porch. On Tuesday morning, the South Carolina family checked their camera, which casually showed a black bear ringing their doorbell, wondering if anyone was home.

According to Greenville County resident Wendy Watson, she nearly spit out her morning cup of coffee after finding footage from her Remo+ video doorbell capturing the jaw-dropping moment around 3:30 am.

“The bear kind of ambled up on the porch and was reaching up around the doorbell, and there was a little nose print on the window that you can see,” Watson told a local news outlet.

She continued: “He looked around a little bit and went back down, and while he was out here, he ate a lot of bird seeds.”

However, according to Watson, this isn’t the first time the family has seen a bear casually roaming around their home. Per Watson’s accounts, the friendly neighborhood beast is a frequent visitor. The bear loves getting a snack from two of Watson’s bird feeders.

“He took out a couple of our bird feeders. One I had just gotten for Mother’s Day with a camera inside it, though the camera was inside charging at the time,” she said. However, she added that the seemingly innocent bear did no other damage.

Black bear loves the taste of birdseed

Additionally, Watson says the bear is always welcome at her home despite stealing some bird seed from time to time. However, Watson plans to take down most of her feeders, except for one.

It’s thought the black bear is a young adult black bear believed to be between the ages of two and four, said Greg Lucas, a Conservation Educator with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

Lucas also encourages residents to remove their feeders and ensure their trash is sealed correctly. In South Carolina, bear sightings are common, as the state is home to over 1,000 black bears, according to reports.

More than two-thirds of them live in the western part of the state, near the Appalachian Mountains.

If you find yourself face to face with a bear, park rangers advise people not to run from bears. Instead make them aware of your presence by speaking loudly, singing, or clapping their hands.

Blue Ridge authorities find bear locked inside car

One person in the Blue Ridge Mountains had not such a pleasant experience with the always-hungry animal. One vehicle owner in the area was left scratching their head after a curious bear figured out how to break into their car.

“Officers were dispatched to a vehicle unlock this morning in Hilltop,” Blue Ridge Public Safety wrote on their Facebook page. “Once they arrived, they found the vehicle locked with a bear inside.”

Thankfully, the black bear emerged unscathed after the whole ordeal. Unfortunately, however, we can’t say the same for the car. “Needless to say, Bear -1 Vehicle -0,” the post added.

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