Couple Finds Extremely Rare ‘One in 15 Million’ Diamond In Arkansas State Park

by Megan Molseed
couple-finds-extremely-rare-one-in-15-million-diamond-arkansas-state-park
(Getty Images/PaaschPhotography)

Visitors to Arkansas’s Crater of Diamonds State Park get a very unique outdoor experience as they are invited to sift through the earth, looking for – you guessed it – precious diamonds. Many of the stones found in this popular state park are less than a carat. However, every once in a while a larger stone is uncovered. But very few are as big as the impressive rock that one couple uncovered during their recent visit to the area.

Minnesota Couple Gets An Unbelievable Anniversary Surprise In Arkansas State Park

Jessica and Seth Erickson were traveling on a multi-state road trip for their 10th anniversary. During this trip, the pair stopped at the popular Arkansas state park, Crater of Diamonds. While there, the two spent the morning digging in the soil, looking for a shiny find. Then, after quite some time sifting through they spotted something unique. A large diamond that Jessica and Seth describe as being the color of iced tea.

The couple then took their unique find to the park’s Diamond Discovery Center. Here, the staff weighed the impressive stone at 1.9 carats.

Most Diamonds Found In The Area Are Smaller Than One Carat

Crater of Diamonds sits about 60 miles from the Arkansas-Oklahoma border. This is the only public mine of its type in the world where people can hunt for the precious stone at their source, reports note.

“Diamond State Park is a lamproite, a volcanic rock that together with kimberlites is a common host for diamonds,” notes Nicolas Flament, a geologist, and geophysicist at the University of Wollongong in Australia.

“These rapid eruptions bring material from tens of kilometers depth to the surface, including diamonds,” Flament adds.

“The vast majority are small (less than one carat),” explains a spokesperson with the Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment’s Geological Survey.

“Since the volcanic pipe’s emplacement, the area has been subjected to erosion, scattering the diamonds,” the spokesperson continues. “Now that the area is a park, it is plowed periodically to control vegetation and expose fresh ground.”

When a diamond is refined and cut, a clear stone of this size could be worth over $24,000. However, this could vary depending on the cut and the color.

Outsider.com