HomeOutdoorsNewsHaving One Key Thing in Your Garage Could Be an Open Invitation for Snakes

Having One Key Thing in Your Garage Could Be an Open Invitation for Snakes

by Emily Morgan
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Photo by: Johnemac72

Even the biggest animal lovers want to keep wildlife in the wild. But, unfortunately, despite our best efforts, sometimes they get inside our homes and become a pesky problem. Here, we’re revealing what you may have near your home or in your garage that signals an open invite to snakes.

Although snakes can help keep other animals, like mice and rats, at bay, no one wants them as tenants.

According to the Georgia-based pest control company Northwest Exterminating, the worst time to expect a slithering visitor is during the fall. This is because the creatures are more active during that time of year and, as a result, go looking to explore.

Snake experts say there are multiple reasons for this. First, most snakes are born in the summer months, meaning you’re more likely to see baby snakes in the fall as they start looking for food.

In addition, snakes move around during the autumn months because they are looking for prime real estate for hibernation. Moreover, some snakes try to find romance during this time of year.

Regardless of their behavior, homeowners can take action to keep them from entering their residences.

How pet food creates a pesky issue for homeowners

According to Rachel Salant, an animal behavior specialist, people who keep pet food outside are inadvertently making themselves a target to snakes. She says it’s like you have a huge sign that says ‘vacancy’ on your house.

“People may want to keep pet food outside because they prefer to feed their pets outside. However, I highly discourage this,” she said.

Brian Clark, a biological expert, says your pet’s food creates two problems for people. First, the food has heaps of protein, which snakes love to feast on. Secondly, it has a strong smell that snakes can smell from miles away.

However, pest expert, Jack Miller, disagrees. He says they aren’t all that interested in the food. Instead, he suggests that snakes want to go after the rodents that feed on the pet food. Miller adds that rodents are the first to sniff for pet food left outside. As a result, lurking snakes want to go after small mammals.

“Snakes are carnivorous animals that feed on rats and mice and prefer to have easy access to their food,” Miller said.

Regardless of which theory you side with, feeding your fur babies indoors is probably best. However, it may not be a viable option for some people. If so, Salant urges people to store it properly.

“If you absolutely must keep bags or cans of pet food stored outside, make sure it is in an airtight, sealed container,” she says. She adds that metal containers are better than plastic since mice can chew through plastic.

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