Hurricane Ian Leaves Caskets, Human Remains Exposed at Florida Cemetery in Storm’s Aftermath

by Emily Morgan
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Photo by: Skeezer

After Hurricane Ian ripped through the sunshine state, it destroyed homes, decimated businesses, and even took power away from over two million people. While the storm has had a tragic effect on the living, it’s also affected the deceased.

According to reports, human remains of those laid to rest were exposed after torrential rain and battering wind hit a central Florida cemetery.

In a video, viewers can see a graveyard in Oakland, Florida, where some graves were exposed during Hurricane Ian’s heavy rain and winds. As a result of the rainfall, people were horrified to learn that their loved one’s caskets had been unearthed. Some even floated away from their burial plots.

In Orange County, families hurried to the cemetery following the flooding, scared that their loved ones had been swept away. “My family buried our grandmother here last Tuesday.” one man told news reporters. “It’s hard to believe.”

The footage also showed several fallen trees throughout the area that the storm engulfed in floodwaters. According to officials, Oakland is less than 20 miles from Orlando, which experienced “historic flooding.”

“Right now, it’s a lot. It’s kinda hard to really believe,” said one man about his unearthed family member who had recently passed away. According to news reports, he rushed to the burial site to ensure his grandmother, who was only buried last Tuesday, hadn’t been one of those who washed away.

In addition, the man said his uncle was supposed to be laid to rest at the cemetery on Saturday. However, he doesn’t believe his service will happen anytime soon considering the current weather conditions. “I was born and raised in Oakland, and unfortunately, this is happening,” the man said about the tragedy.

Hurricane Ian leaves Florida in ruins, moves on to Carolinas

Hurricane Ian moved out of Florida late Thursday, increasing from a tropical storm back to a hurricane as it moves to the Carolinas. Back in Florida, people are beginning to clean up the catastrophic devastation. In addition, the historic flooding resulted in at least 11 deaths, with many more expected.

According to President Joe Biden, Ian “could be the deadliest hurricane in Florida history,” responsible for a “substantial loss of life.” Initial reports of lives lost include six in Charlotte County, two in Lee County, two in Sarasota County, and one in Volusia County.

In addition, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis didn’t give the exact death toll at news conferences. However, DeSantis surveyed the damage in Fort Myers Beach on Thursday, saying some of it was “indescribable.”

“There were cars floating in the middle of the water,” DeSantis said. “Some of the homes were total losses.”

According to meteorologists, Ian has transitioned off the east coast of Florida and is expected to head north early Friday. Ian will approach the South Carolina coast on Friday. The eye of the storm will move inland across the Carolinas on Friday night and Saturday.

Outsider.com